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D.C.’s Shiloh Baptist Church receives threats

D.C.’s Shiloh Baptist Church receives threats

The Washington Post reports that the church that President Obama and his family attended on Easter Sunday has received threats of violence after a conservative television commentator played a videotape, recorded in January, 2010, in which the pastor said that those espousing racial prejudice do so “under the protective cover of talk radio.”


Hamil Harris writes:

The Rev. Wallace Charles Smith said the church has received more than 100 threats since Fox News channel’s Sean Hannity aired a tape Monday of a speech Smith gave in January 2010 at Eastern University in Saint Davids, Pa.

“We received a fax that had the image of a monkey with a target across is face,” Smith said. “My secretary has received telephone calls that have been so vulgar until she has had to hang up.”

Smith, who shared several of the e-mails with The Post, said he had not notified authorities but is consulting with church leaders about what to do.

On Sunday, Obama and the first family visited the church, founded in the 1860s by former slaves. On Monday, Hannity aired a clip of a speech Smith gave when he served as president of Palmer Theological Seminary in Philadelphia.

“It may not be Jim Crow anymore,” Smith says in the videotape. “Now, Jim Crow wears blue pinstripes, goes to law school and carries fancy briefs in cases. And now, Jim Crow has become James Crow, esquire. And he doesn’t have to wear white robes anymore because now he can wear the protective cover of talk radio or can get a regular news program on Fox.”

Smith, 62, said that he had been asked to give a speech on racism and that he “was giving some background on what I thought were some of the issues regarding race in this country.”

Hannity compared Smith to Obama’s controversial former pastor, the Rev. Jeremiah Wright, whom Obama denounced after YouTube videos surfaced showing Wright saying that the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks were “America’s chickens . . . coming home to roost.”

Ronald Reagan, George H.W. Bush and Bill Clinton have attended Shiloh while they were President, each time listening to Smith preach. Hannity did not comment on the content of the actual sermon but took three days to find the clip and create yet another controversy under the protective cover of cable news.

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tgflux

From Rev Smith’s Easter sermon: “[Pastor Smith] talked about how his baby grandson’s gurgling is actually “talking” because he is saying ‘I am here … they tried to write me off as 3/5 a person in the Constitution, but I am here right now … and is saying I am not going to let anybody from stopping me from being what God wants me to be.’”

What’s “alarming” about this, Sean? I don’t follow.

I believe you’re nitpicking about the “3/5 of a person” thing. Yes, it was about a political compromise (so the slave-holding South wouldn’t get greater representation in the House of Representatives based on population). But the LARGER Truth, was that it Constitutionally codifed the despicable notion of enslaved African-Americans as less-than-fully-human.

Smith’s larger point, IMO, still stands.

JC Fisher

Michael Dresbach

Mr. McDermott, I found this statement to be true: “Now, Jim Crow wears blue pinstripes, goes to law school and carries fancy briefs in cases. And now, Jim Crow has become James Crow, esquire. And he doesn’t have to wear white robes anymore because now he can wear the protective cover of talk radio or can get a regular news program on Fox.”

Revdo. Michael Dresbach

Padre Mickey

Sean McDermott

Revdo. Michael Dresbach:

First off, thanks for your comment. My whole point in replying to this item is clarity. It raised questions for me, so I put forth some facts on the matter, and asked some clarifying questions -.

What truths are there in Rev. Smith’s statements?

From Rev Smith’s Easter sermon: “[Pastor Smith] talked about how his baby grandson’s gurgling is actually “talking” because he is saying ‘I am here … they tried to write me off as 3/5 a person in the Constitution, but I am here right now … and is saying I am not going to let anybody from stopping me from being what God wants me to be.’”

This isn’t at all alarming??

Michael Dresbach

It seems that any church the president and his family attend will not be good enough for those on the right who despise him. Another empty controversy is being whipped up, but the truths of the Rev. Smith’s statements are being ignored.

I find this all very sad.

Revdo. Michael Dresbach

Padre Mickey

Sean McDermott

I’m at a loss. You’re saying Hannity is culpable for these wingnuts calling the church and faxing horrible things to the church? How?

Roughly 24 hours after Rev Smith’s sermon, it’s summary was on the internet – http://www.theblaze.com/stories/obamas-easter-sunday-pastorrails-against-racist-talk-radio-compares-rush-to-kkk/ I urge you to check it out. He says some rather odd things for an Easter sermon.

A point of fact:

The 3/5 clause was about counting slaves for the census and enumeration purposes. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Three-fifths_compromise

It had nothing to do with saying a slave was “3/5 of a human being”. IF that were true, then why on Earth would abolitionists have fought for slaves to be counted as 0, and the slave holding south 1 – 3/5 was reached as a compromise. You should never, ever compromise with evil. Our country paid a great price, and to a large extent still does.

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