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Crown

Crown

JulieQuinnCrown_500.jpg

My father died in an accident 6 years ago. He was a constant encouragement to me in my painting and spiritual journey and I still miss him desperately. I remember laughing with him, because though he loved my work, he never quite understood abstract art and was always asking me to paint him a boat. I said, “Dad, even if I do paint you a boat, you won’t recognize it — it will be too abstract.” But there was one painting that he completely understood, and it is the one pictured above titled “Crown.”

He said it looked like the crown he would someday receive in heaven with beautiful jewels in it. And that he could also see shadows of the thorny crown that his beloved savior wore for him in the background… and that is exactly what this painting is about.

He had a photo of this painting in his pocket when he died. He carried it around with him wherever he went. I know my father is safely in the arms of Jesus now, and I’m very sure that the crown he received is much more beautiful than this.

Image above (and on front-page mastheads): Crown by Julie Quinn.

Words above by Julie Quinn.

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Diane

Wonderful piece, wonderful story. Thank you!

[Diane Walker added by ed.]

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Roberta Karstetter

This is great! Love the art work, and the story associated with it too!

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