Support the Café
Search our site

Churches in Ferguson, MO receive grant money

Churches in Ferguson, MO receive grant money

The Episcopal Church announced today that an additional $40,000 in grant money would go to the feeding programs in Ferguson, Missouri run by Episcopal parishes.

St. Stephen’s (Ferguson), Ascension (Northwoods), and All Saints (Saint Louis City) have all been in the forefront of working with the community during the wave of protests and police crackdowns that followed the shooting of Michael Brown by police over a month ago.


The local feeding programs in Ferguson were hard hit during the worst of the unrest. The closure of the business district of Ferguson and the imposition of curfews put pressure on an already strained local economy.

Objectives of the proposal include:

• To implement nutrition education, counseling and food preparation programs at All Saints’ and Ascension Episcopal Churches, as well as replenish and expand the food and personal care products provided through the pantries operated by St. Stephen’s, All Saints’ and Ascension.

• To develop and implement a community collaborative to assist in funding the economic recovery and revitalization of Ferguson-area businesses.

• To develop and implement a public/private sector partnership to extend the reach of the St. Stephen’s, All Saints’ and Ascension food pantries to the homebound in North St. Louis County and City through a mobile service staffed by trained, mentored and compensated young residents of the community.

Read the whole report here.

Dislike (0)
Facebooktwitterpinterestlinkedinmail

Café Comments?

Our comment policy requires that you use your real first and last names and provide an email address (your email will not be published). Comments that use non-PG rated language, include personal attacks, that are not provable as fact or that we deem in any way to be counter to our mission of fostering respectful dialogue will not be posted.

Facebooktwitterrss
Support the Café
Past Posts
2020_001

The Episcopal Café seeks to be an independent voice, reporting and reflecting on the Episcopal Church and the Anglican tradition.  The Café is not a platform of advocacy, but it does aim to tell the story of the church from the perspective of Progressive Christianity.  Our collective sympathy, as the Café, lies with the project of widening the circle of inclusion within the church and empowering all the baptized for the role to which they have been called as followers of Christ.

The opinions expressed at the Café are those of individual contributors, and, unless otherwise noted, should not be interpreted as official statements of a parish, diocese or other organization. The art and articles that appear here remain the property of their creators.

All Content  © 2017 Episcopal Café