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Church in Wales reviews structure

Church in Wales reviews structure

Members and leaders of the Episcopal Church aren’t the only ones thinking about restructuring in the service of mission. The Church in Wales has completed a top to bottom review process that examined the church’s structure and ministry.

ACNS:

A radical new vision for the future of the Church in Wales is set out in a report launched today.

Supersize parishes run by teams of vicars and lay people, creative ideas for ensuring churches stay at the heart of their communities and investing further in ministry to young people are among the report’s recommendations following an independent root and branch review.

The Church in Wales commissioned the review a year ago to address some of its challenges and to ensure it was fit for purpose as it faced its centenary in 2020. Three experienced people in ministry and church management examined its structures and ministry and heard evidence from public meetings across Wales attended by more than 1,000 people.

On the Review Group were: Lord (Richard) Harries of Pentregarth, former Bishop of Oxford, who chaired it; Professor Charles Handy, former professor of the London Business School; and Professor Patricia Peattie, first chairwoman of the Lothian University Hospitals NHS Trust and former Chair of the Episcopal Church in Scotland’s Standing Committee.

Their report will now be presented to the Church’s Governing Body for consideration.

It makes 50 recommendations which include:

Parishes replaced by much larger ‘ministry areas’ which would mirror the catchment areas of secondary schools, where possible, and be served by a team of clergy and lay people;

Creative use of church buildings to enable them to be used by the whole community;

Training lay people to play a greater part in church leadership;

Investing more in ministry for young people;

Developing new forms of worship to reach out to those unfamiliar with church services;

Encouraging financial giving to the church through tithing.

The Archbishop of Wales, Dr Barry Morgan, welcomed the report. He said, “We are enormously indebted to the Review Group because it has absorbed a great deal of information about us as a church in a short period of time and has made some very perceptive and insightful comments and recommendations. I am also grateful to members of the Church in Wales who in large numbers have enthusiastically engaged with the process. We, as a church, will have to give serious consideration to this report and its recommendations from parish up to province and decide where we go from here.”

Lord Harries said, “The Review Team found the Church in Wales to be very warm and welcoming and there are many good things happening. But in order to serve the people of Wales effectively, particularly its young people, we believe some radical re-thinking is necessary.”

Whole report here.

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Jesse Zink

An interesting report, both for what it suggests and what it doesn't. I think one of the most interesting aspects is what it has to say about bishops and the culture of dependency on them in the church.

Can re-structuring conversations in the American church involve conversation about the role of bishops in our life?

-Jesse

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