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Church in a bar

Church in a bar

Worship in a bar? It’s become commonplace to hear of congregations holding meetings or bible study groups in coffee shop, but Sunday service in working bar? While the bar is still open?


Two congregations in Brooklyn are doing that regularly now. Church goers pick up their drinks and move to the back of the room for worship. They take their smartphone bibles with them in one hand and hold their libations in another. They refill as necessary.

One of the congregations meets in the Trash Bar:

“Mr. Turrigiano and Trash Bar came together in the way of many Brooklyn odd couples –through the website Craigslist. The pastor had posted an ad under the heading “Unconventional Church Needs Bar,” and Trash Bar was one of the few to respond.

“We said we will give you business at a time when you don’t have business,” Mr. Turrigiano said.

It was the same sort of negotiation Revolution NYC pastor Jay Bakker, the 36-year-old son of televangelists Jim Bakker and Tammy Faye Bakker Messner, made to secure space for his flock at Pete’s Candy Store. The bar’s owners get a nominal fee, Mr. Bakker said, and in return his congregants bolster the bar’s till before, during and after the service.

“We opened an hour early just for them,” said bartender Dave Thrasher. “So it is business we wouldn’t normally have.””

The other congregation, named “Revolution” meets in Pete’s Candy Store and is headed by Jay Bakker, the son of Jim and Tammy Faye Bakker.

“My whole life I have gone to Catholic church and hated it because it was boring and miserable,” said Will Zucconi, 27, who has been attending Revolution services for a year. “I like to drink and I like to go to church, and if I can do both at the same time and that’s cool.”

More here in the Wall Street Journal.

I checked by the way. This is dated 3/30/12 and not written on April 1.

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Josh Magda

There's space both for rave and chant in Church, as last night I was streaming Marian chant on this beautiful album I'd like to get.

http://www.soundstrue.com/shop/Songs-of-Mary/2691.productdetails

As I've said in other posts the new doesn't have to be the enemy of the old, and I think healthy worship going forward will be a blend.

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Bill Dilworth

Ah, but it doesn't say he wouldn't step foot in a traditional church, just that he hated the RC church. Liking is optional... 😉

I would click in that YouTube link, but I just know I would regret interrupting the Anglican chant playlist I'm grooving to on my iPhone right now.

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Josh Magda

Bill, I think it was here

“My whole life I have gone to Catholic church and hated it because it was boring and miserable,” said Will Zucconi, 27, who has been attending Revolution services for a year. “I like to drink and I like to go to church, and if I can do both at the same time and that’s cool.”

Of course, if I could I would worship myself at a Cosmic Mass, modeled on rave masses in England as part of Fresh Expressions, I believe. Long before I found out about Matt Fox I found rave music (without drugs) to be highly worshipful.

http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=1625633075153286458

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Bill Dilworth

Josh, I looked for the quote you alluded to. Couldn't find it, or anything close. Where'd you find it?

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Bill Dilworth

It's not the place that concerns me, it's the drinking. Recreational drugs and church don't mix well. And before some weisenheimer points out that Taylor's Tawny Port has a considerable amount of alcohol in it, I point out we give tiny little sips, and no refills.

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