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Church of the Holy Sepulchre reopens

Church of the Holy Sepulchre reopens

Three days after its doors were barred in protest at Jerusalem municipal tax demands and a Church Lands Bill placed before the Knesset, the Patriarchs and Heads of the churches in charge of the Holy Sepulchre in Old Jerusalem will reopen the building to the public following after Prime Minister Netanyahu and the Mayor of Jerusalem agreed to place the controversial measures on hold.

We, the heads of Churches in charge of the Holy Sepulcher and the Status Quo governing the various Christian Holy Sites in Jerusalem – the Greek Orthodox Patriarchate, the Custody of the Holy Land and the Armenian Patriarchate – give thanks to God for the statement released earlier today by Prime Minister Netanyahu and offer our gratitude to all those who have worked tirelessly to uphold the Christian presence in Jerusalem and to defend the Status Quo.

After the constructive intervention of the Prime Minister, The Churches look forward to engage with Minister Hanegbi, and with all those who love Jerusalem to ensure that Our Holy City, where our Christian presence continues to face challenges, remains a place where the three Monotheistic faiths may live and thrive together.

Following these recent developments we hereby announce that the Church of the Holy Sepulcher, that is the site of the crucifixion of Our Lord and also of His Resurrection, will be reopened to the pilgrims tomorrow, February 28th, 2018 at 4.00 AM

THEOPHILOS III,  Patriarch of Jerusalem
FRANCESCO PATTON, Custos of the Holy Land
NOURHAN MANOUGIAN, Armenian Patriarch of Jerusalem

Background on the story is here.

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