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Christian-Muslim Summit calls for mutual respect

Christian-Muslim Summit calls for mutual respect

Bishop John Chane, retired bishop of Washington DC participated in the Christian-Muslim Summit. Catholic News Service reports:

Holding the third Christian-Muslim Summit in Rome Dec. 2-4, the leaders said that while more and more women are involved in high-level dialogues, there is still much to be done, including recognizing that “women play a key role in peace building.” The Catholic, Sunni and Shiite delegations at the summit each included one woman scholar; the Anglican delegation included two women clergy and two female scholars.

“Enough is enough. We are brothers in Abraham, we speak different languages, we live in different parts of the world,” but Christianity and Islam both teach that “humanity is one family” and religious leaders have an obligation to resist attempts to divide brothers and sisters with violence, said Episcopal Bishop John Bryson Chane of Washington. Bishop Chane spoke Dec. 4 at the final, public session of the summit, which concluded with a “call to action” that also included pledges: to travel together to areas affected by severe violence as a sign to their followers that Christianity and Islam are religions of peace; to focus more attention on equipping young people to live with respect for other faiths; and to promote collaboration among Catholic, Anglican and Muslim aid agencies.

The declaration was signed by Bishop Chane; Cardinal Jean-Louis Tauran, president of the Pontifical Council for Interreligious Dialogue; Prince El Hassan bin Talal of Jordan; and Ayatollah Seyyed Mostafa Mohaghegh Damad of Iran.

 

Vatican Radio reports on the recently concluded Christian-Muslim Summit held in Rome:

The members of the III Christian-Muslim Summit of Religious Leaders and Scholars released a statement after their 3-day meeting this week in Rome. The theme was “Christians and Muslims: Believers in Society”.

The statement said the meeting was “characterised by mutual respect, opening and listening to each other; this constitutes a message of reconciliation, peace and fraternity of which our world is in great need.”

From the Press Release issued by the religious leaders and scholars:

The Christian-Muslim Summit is a gathering of Christian (Catholics and Anglican Episcopal) and Muslim (Sunni and Shia) Religious Leaders and Scholars from around the world who come together for purposes of fostering interreligious and intercultural relationships and to address issues of conflict, in particular between the followers of both religions….

The theme chosen for reflection and discussion by the participants is “Christians and Muslims: Believers in Society”. The four Principals and their respective delegations, along with the guests of honour from the Ecumenical Patriarchate of Constantinople, from Judaism, along with others, are aware of this dramatic time in our world, especially in the Middle East and in some African countries, with an un-preceded and unhuman violence….

A public Session took place at the end of the Seminar, to which Diplomats accredited to the Holy See, persons involved in interreligious dialogue and media operators were invited. The “Call for Action of the Summit” was read, followed by questions and answers. The meeting was characterised by mutual respect, opening and listening to each other; this constitutes a message of reconciliation, peace and fraternity of which our world is in great need.

Posted by Ann Fontaine

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Donna Hicks

It would indeed be powerful to see these leaders "travel together to areas affected by severe violence as a sign to their followers that Christianity and Islam are religions of peace." How about Aleppo and Baghdad, Yemen and the Central African Republic for starters? And then there are people on the ground already modeling this. Check this out: http://www.theguardian.com/global-development/2014/nov/13/central-african-republic-catholic-priest-saves-muslims-seleka-christians-father-bernard-kinvi

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