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Category: The Lead

Episcopal Church releases Racial Justice Audit

After two years and more than 1,300 surveys, the ground-breaking Racial Justice Audit of Episcopal Leadership is now available to the wider church and public. The audit identifies nine “patterns” of systemic racism – ranging from the historical context of church leadership to current power dynamics — that will also be highlighted in three public webinars in May and June.

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Sewanee makes two moves related to racism

The University of the South, commonly known as Sewanee, has made two recent moves addressing racism in its past. A stain-glass window in the chapel will be updated to remove the Confederate flag. And a School of Theology lecture series named for William Porcher DuBose, a slavery and KKK apologist will be renamed.

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All Saints – Mobile replaces stolen BLM banner, again

The governing board of the majority-white Episcopal church voted to hang the banner after internal discussion of racism last year following the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis. It was stolen before. It was again as the trial of former officer Derek Chauvin, charged with Floyd’s murder, proceeds in Minneapolis.

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Augusta church to move Polk memorial, when and where TBD

The vestry of St. Paul’s Augusta voted in November to move the memorial to Leonidas Polk, the Confederate General and Bishop of the Diocese of Louisiana. The memorial plaque is located behind the altar. No date or location has been set for the relocation of the memorial. The decision to move the memorial caused a split in the church with financial fallout.

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The Episcopal Café seeks to be an independent voice, reporting and reflecting on the Episcopal Church and the Anglican tradition.  The Café is not a platform of advocacy, but it does aim to tell the story of the church from the perspective of Progressive Christianity.  Our collective sympathy, as the Café, lies with the project of widening the circle of inclusion within the church and empowering all the baptized for the role to which they have been called as followers of Christ.

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