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Category: The Magazine

Facets of identity

These four terms – Christian, Anglican, Episcopalian, and post-theist – are how I describe my religious identity. I choose which term(s) to use on a particular occasion depending upon context and what I want to communicate about myself.

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When we stay, what emerges is communion

Christian formation and identity for me were shaped not just by difference, but by contradiction and conflict. From my own earliest experience of church community, my family was out of sync with people in our church that we loved.

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Writing Rule of Life – loss and grief

Grief is heavy. It drags one down like a burlap bag of scrap metal over one’s shoulder – it weighs down, heavy, and sharp metal ends – jagged, rusty tear-stained bits poke through the burlap and then the shirt into one’s fleshy back.

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Communion means Communion

“A Communion of churches, at the very least surely, are churches that can celebrate communion together, churches where they accept the validity of each others ordinations, churches where someone ordained in one church can preside in the other.
What is called “The Anglican Communion” is not such a communion.” -Bosco Peters

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What Difference Does it Make That We Are an Episcopal Church?

Increasingly I realize that Baptism is what makes us part of a worldwide communion. I am ready to celebrate the faith we share, ready to be challenged by those Christian theologies that are different from my own (though, if I am honest, I don’t want to be challenged too much….). I want to believe that I can walk into any Christian Church in the world and call it my church (though I know not every church agrees with me).

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Writing a Rule of Life – a consideration of our thoughts

We spend a lot of our time thinking, we humans do. And much of our thinking is fear-based, shame-based and anxiety-producing causing sleepless nights and cancer. So our Rule of Life needs to have some chapters that help to remind us of how we want to be in relationship with our thoughts – what our own thought-boundaries are, or what we hope them to one day become.

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Letter to the Editor: putting a human face on the Primates’ “sanctions”

The Primates Meeting in January 2016 called for sanctions against TEC. Archbishop Josiah Idowu-Fearon said that the primates’ decision has this result: “the three-year absence of a gifted priest, ecumenist, and Bible scholar who serves on our dialogue with the World Communion of Reformed Churches” That is, although the primates’ resolution “applies to the TEC as a whole,” it “practically involves” just one person.

I am the person to whom the Secretary General referred.

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A musician on observing a holy Lent

by Susan E. Bloomfield

 

On Ash Wednesday, The Book of Common Prayer invites us to the “observance of a holy Lent, by self-examination and repentance; by prayer, fasting and self-denial, and by reading and meditating on God’s holy Word.”

 

As a professional musician, I naturally view things through a musical lens. Recently, I have been reflecting on the tenets of Lent outlined in the Prayer Book and thinking about how each of these can be interpreted as a musical metaphor or […]

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The Episcopal Café seeks to be an independent voice, reporting and reflecting on the Episcopal Church and the Anglican tradition.  The Café is not a platform of advocacy, but it does aim to tell the story of the church from the perspective of Progressive Christianity.  Our collective sympathy, as the Café, lies with the project of widening the circle of inclusion within the church and empowering all the baptized for the role to which they have been called as followers of Christ.

The opinions expressed at the Café are those of individual contributors, and, unless otherwise noted, should not be interpreted as official statements of a parish, diocese or other organization. The art and articles that appear here remain the property of their creators.

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