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Category: Speaking to the Soul

Praying up a storm

The trees are swaying and dipping, murmuring and hollering,
dropping and dripping; some prostrate themselves, as though
this were the Holy Spirit giving voice to their prayers with
sighs too deep for words.

The trees have been set free. They sing.

I am a little afraid of their religious fervour.
I am a little in awe of their holy abandonment.
I envy their prayer.
They have reduced me to a whisper.

I suppose I had imagined the trees
of the field on a summer’s day,
waving gently,
genteelly applauding.

But creation is a […]

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Do Not be Anxious

“It’s August of 2020 and to think that we should not be anxious about anything is almost laughable. Whether we’re working on the front lines of the pandemic, fearful for our health and the health of our family, making decisions for schooling and work, examining our own privilege, worried about the upcoming election and our inability to thoughtfully listen to each other, or all the other day-to-day worries of work and relationships, there is plenty for everyone to be anxious about.”

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Spiritual Transformation and Feeding Five Thousand

“This is a spiritual transformation.  It’s a reorienting of life that places the welfare of our neighbors and of the planet as our foremost, our primary concerns,  But more than that, it’s a complete change in where we look for the meeting of our needs.  We count on God’s provision rather than our own.  We are not fed by ‘Caesar,’ we are fed by Christ.”

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The Prophet Who Lost His Head

“It’s a comfort to me to know that God’s heart and hands are big enough and loving enough to enclose all of us, no matter whether I think they are unworthy, rotten to the core, or uncaring about anyone other than themselves. God doesn’t always seem to protect the prophets who try to draw attention to things Christians and others should pay attention to, but that has often been the plight of prophets since the job of prophet first appeared.”

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Inigo Montoya…um..I mean, Inigo Lopez de Loyola

“Those things in our lives that we wrestle with, those places where our old instincts and our evolving new instincts grapple head to head with each other, are precisely the exercises we need to have the chance to choose our own forks in the road where we discover what God truly had in store for us.  We seldom know it at the time we choose it, but time and insight often reveal them retrospectively.”

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Standing Firm in Witness

“This day may we too, especially, stand firm in witness to the love of Christ in the world. May we be emboldened ourselves, all of us, to live into our callings as witnesses and ministers of Jesus, as steadfast disciples even in the face of injustice and the attempts to silence the testimony of women in communities of faith throughout the ages.”

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Feast of Mary and Martha

“Mary and Martha are each disciples of Jesus doing ministry in the world. Mary is off, out of town, away with other disciples doing ministry in the world. Martha is doing ministry in her home town and she is anxious to the point a panic attack. She is anxious because Mary is away, she wants her sister near her, home with her, doing ministry in their home town. She is worried for Mary and anxious. Jesus hears Martha and calls her back into her-self, back into her work and ministry in the town, while also assuring her that Mary is fine out in the world. In other words, Jesus supports each woman being who she is and doing the ministry they are doing as they are doing it.”

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Blessing the Days

“Take heart, friend. We’re in this together. I give thanks for this last month, and for the month to come. May we find the strength to walk the road ahead of us trusting that we do not go alone.”

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The Episcopal Café seeks to be an independent voice, reporting and reflecting on the Episcopal Church and the Anglican tradition.  The Café is not a platform of advocacy, but it does aim to tell the story of the church from the perspective of Progressive Christianity.  Our collective sympathy, as the Café, lies with the project of widening the circle of inclusion within the church and empowering all the baptized for the role to which they have been called as followers of Christ.

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