Category: Daily Episcopalian

Anglican Covenant Week: The holy mess that is Section Four

Agreeing to an undefined, unspecified process in which the decision-making bodies have full discretion to act in any manner they deem best–not only as to the process but as to the standard and burden of proof, information considered, and all other aspects of the dispute resolution system–is what the covenant contemplates. There is no procedural due process and no substantive due process guaranteed by the covenant.

Revisiting Evelyn Underhill: the Centennial Year of Mysticism

What is fascinating about Mysticism, and a thread through all of Underhill’s writing, is her simple insistence that spiritual experience is about God, and not (primarily) about our own internal psychology or makeup. A thoughtful and well-reasoned Christian apologist, she is unapologetic about insisting on the “reality” of God as the ground of mystical experience.

In defense of seminaries

Mr. Bowyer claims, in columns published on April 20 and May 11, that seminary is, basically, a waste of time. Clergy are not trained properly in seminary, he says. Among the claims he makes is that learning about such topics as Church History and Theology does nothing to prepare a person for leading a congregation.

A living hope

Hope changes things. God is not like an especially powerful creature, but is the ground of our very being. When we come to new birth in Christ–when we stop presenting an obstacle to God’s mercy in our lives–we grow in our freedom.

My unintentional Lent

This Lent, I suggested we banish the phrase “I want” from our conversations. The goal, I explained, was to spend less energy thinking about what we don’t have and more being grateful for what we do. I framed this as a family discipline, but really, I saw it as a way to get my kids to stop driving me crazy with their endless pleas for more, more, more.

What sort of victory?

The twin towers flaming, their haunting shells rising from the rubble broke through America’s collective psychological defenses with the bewildering news that some people hate us, that not everyone shares our confidence in capitalism, that the hearts of many do not warm to the slogan “Truth, Justice, and the American way.” 9/11 was an attack on our national integrity.

“Met Jesus on Pilgrimage, still walking.”

They have no clue that the stranger they meet on the road is Jesus. Which suggests that witnessing the empty tomb is not the same as witnessing the resurrection. The absence of death isn’t the same as the presence of life. Death isn’t an end in itself. The death of Jesus isn’t the end of the story. There is something else that needs to fill that empty space.