Category: Daily Episcopalian

Part 1: The Joys of F.O.G.

by Donald Schell Part 1 of 2 Last month my congregation offered a free week-long day camp called F.O.G, an apt name for a summer gathering in San Francisco with perennial summer weather report, “Foggy near the coast, clearing by noon.” I think the joke is deliberate, but as an acronym it also refers to […]

Embodied teaching

by Maria L. Evans “Take,​ ​eat: This is my Body, which is given for you. Do this for the remembrance of me.”–from the Words of Institution, Eucharistic Prayer A, p.362, Book of Common Prayer I wish I had a dollar for every case of a less than one centimeter diameter ductal carcinoma-in-situ of the breast […]

Who is Responsible?

by Linda Ryan Like a lot of other people, I’ve been reading and watching various reports and commentaries on the recent Hobby Lobby case. The Supreme Court voted 5-4 that Hobby Lobby should have the right to refuse to cover birth control for its employees on the grounds that it violates their (Hobby Lobby’s, or […]

Wanting to be heard

by Marshall Scott Not long ago I was responding to a news item on The Lead, and made this observation: So, I find myself with this reflection, applicable on all sides: just because my argument has not been found compelling, it does not mean my argument has not been heard. I often find that hard […]

Holy Communion

The Eucharist makes us available to the ever-changing and changeable God, the Creator who loves each of us beyond our capacity to understand. Immanuel, God-with-us, who is always alive in our hearts makes himself felt through this liturgy and yanks at us from the inside. It also makes us available at our cores to one another. It crosses all our differences to make us one people, one family, one Body.

The Martyrs of Uganda witness against sexual violence

Those who use the witness of the Martyrs of Uganda to condemn homosexual persons, or to denigrate same sex marriage or as an excuse to persecute GLBT persons miss the power of the original witness of the Martyrs of Uganda. They reduce their deaths to a story of paranoia and social control. In short, they accomplish precisely was the Ugandan king failed to do in 1886.

Going to church to wake up

by Pamela Grenfell Smith Four thousand miles from home, in a city where I didn’t speak the language, I’d staggered off the plane more than a week ago but I still couldn’t get myself in focus. Then we went to a concert. The first piece was Gregorian chant, a familiar passage from Wisdom. Hearing it, […]