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Burying Tamerlan

Burying Tamerlan

A Methodist woman credits her Christianity with her decision to seek a burial place for Tamerlan Tsarnaev, the man who allegedly killed and wounded many with bombs during the Boston Marathon. From AP:

The Virginia woman whose actions led to Boston Marathon bombing suspect Tamerlan Tsarnaev being buried about 30 miles north of her Richmond home said the angry backlash from local officials, some cemetery neighbors and online critics has been unpleasant, but she has no regrets.

“I can’t pretend it’s not difficult to be reviled and maligned,” Martha Mullen told The Associated Press in a telephone interview Friday. “But any time you can reach across the divide and work with people that are not like you, that’s what God calls us to do.”

…..

Mullen, a mental health counselor in private practice and a graduate of United Theological Seminary in Dayton, Ohio, sent emails to various faith organizations to see what could be done. She heard back from Islamic Funeral Services of Virginia, which arranged for a funeral plot at the Al-Barzakh cemetery. “It was an interfaith effort,” she said. Mullen, a member of the United Methodist Church, said she was motivated by her own faith and that she had the full support of her pastor.

h/t to Friends of Jake blog

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janinsanfran

Got to say, I found the protests and reluctance to bury the bomber Tamerlan’s body one of our more dispiriting recent cultural moments. The body was DEAD, for goodness sakes. If there’s more after death, the person is already there.

Glad to hear an interfaith effort broke through the cemetery barrier.

Jan Adams

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