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Breaking: SCOTUS refuses marriage equality ban petitions

Breaking: SCOTUS refuses marriage equality ban petitions

SCOTUSblog reports:

This morning the Court issued additional orders from its September 29 Conference. Most notably, the Court denied review of all seven of the petitions arising from challenges to state bans on same-sex marriage. This means that the lower-court decisions striking down bans in Indiana, Wisconsin, Utah, Oklahoma, and Virginia should go into effect shortly, clearing the way for same-sex marriages in those states and any other state with similar bans in those circuits.

Many people had anticipated that one or more of the same-sex marriage petitions might be on that list, but the Court did not act on any of them at the time. Last month Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg had suggested that the Court might not step into the controversy at this point, because there was no disagreement among the lower courts on that issue.

New York Times reports here.

See map below. What is your diocese doing? or not?

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tgflux

I'm shocked at the thought that I would be able to marry in Utah, Oklahoma or South Carolina, and not in my former home state of Michigan (where I worked to prevent the ban passing back in '04). Come on, Michigan, Get Equal already!

JC Fisher

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