Bread of Life…one more verse

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All due credit for this delightful parody goes to it’s author Josh Hosler

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james oppenheimer
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james oppenheimer

"...credit goes to *its* author..."

It's actually one of my favorite songs. It is in a very solid four four meter. The words simply play within that meter very freely. Maybe folks are bothered because it requires that they disengage their automatic pilots and actually participate in singing. I suppose folks who never learned to read music might be at something of a disadvantage, but they can learn -- Hey, people, it's not rocket science.
It amazes me how resistant people are to a fresh idea.

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Cynthia Katsarelis
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It's hardly a fresh idea, James, it was written before my time. It's written in a pop idiom. People who don't like pop music in church are not likely to like it. This has been a thing for about 50 years now. I'm eclectic, I don't mind this song (it's more of a song than a hymn), but I wouldn't want a steady diet of songs/hymns in this style.

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JC Fisher
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JC Fisher

"And it will Make You Throw Up!
Yes it will Make You Throw Up!
Yes it will Make You Throw Uh-up till the La-ast Day!"

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Ferial Day
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Ferial Day

Doesn't RSM make "Sister" redundant? She's a Religious Sister of Mercy.

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Brother Tom Hudson
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Brother Tom Hudson

Keep in mind that "I am the bread of life" was written in 1966 by a Roman Catholic nun, Sister (which title is not printed in the Hymnal 1982) Suzanne Toolan, RSM.

This appeared in "Catholic Online" in 2007 on the occasion of Sister Suzanne's 80th birthday:
Sister Toolan was one of the first composers to write music for the Catholic Church in English after Vatican II. In 1982, she led the transformation of the Sisters' novitiate into Mercy Center, a retreat and spirituality center, and introduced Taize prayer to the West Coast in 1983. She was a teacher, composer and inspiring spiritual figure at Mercy High School in Burlingame, California for over 30 years.

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Cynthia Katsarelis
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Thank you for that history, Brother Tom!

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Marta Sigmon
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Marta Sigmon

Another view -- I personally like this hymn, but not during communion. It is "vigorous" music, and better sung standing, perhaps after communion. Lots of times my opinion of a piece of music is determined by the situation in which I first heard it -- and just reading this one from the hymnal would not have worked for me.

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Jim Wiant
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Jim Wiant

Meant to write "we may not be comfortable"
The lyrics for this song come from scripture. We may not be comfortable with the text, but the writer of the song is not putting words into Jesus’ mouth. See John 6:35-49

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Jay Croft
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Jay Croft

My un-favorite "hymn" also. I am not comfortable about putting words into the Lord's mouth.

And I very much dislike using this hymn, over and over, while folks are taking communion at the rail.

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Bob Chapman
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So, is someone saying that this song is chant-like? Have you ever looked at #S 275 in the Hymnal?

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Cynthia Katsarelis
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On the FB comments section I had noted that there is liturgical music, chant, whose rhythm comes from the syntax of the text, rather than a meter. The first line of the parody is about the song having no rhythm. I wasn't really saying that this hymn is chant like per se, I was only saying that metric rhythm is not necessarily a key element for liturgical music. My spouse is a chant scholar...

I have mixed feelings about the words of the hymn, though I'm keenly aware that they are from John. I change the words as I sing them, I can't get myself to say that anyone is excluded from eternal life in Christ.

Musically, meh, some are better, some are worse. Most of all, in my parish we almost never, ever, sing any of the hymns that are personal (Ich Lieder, if we were speaking of chorales, in German). And though the quality of our music is excellent, sometimes I do wish for hymns a la LEVAS.

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Cynthia Katsarelis
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Yeah, really, Monte. We generally skip those personal ones, in our parish. I wish we wouldn't.

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Monte Nichols
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Monte Nichols

Yeh – don’t you just hate those overly personal texts, such as “the Lord is MY shepherd, I shall not want, He maketh ME lie down in green pastures, he restoreth MY soul. So sentimental and personal. Surely God never meant for us to get too personal in this religion thing, right?

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Scott Wesley
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I don't particularly care for the rest of this hymn, but this particular verse... it must be in the short list of my all-time favorites...

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