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Black clergy of Ferguson write a protest letter

Black clergy of Ferguson write a protest letter

The Huffington Post reports the National African-American Clergy Network wrote a letter, late last week, decrying the death of Michael Brown in Ferguson. Since then, it has grown exponentially, collecting signatures from folks as diverse as the head of the National Council of Churches to the head of the Seventh Day Adventists.

The statement reads, in part:

In light of the long and bloody trail of lynchings, deaths, and killings of African American youth from Emmett Till, to Trayvon Martin, to Michael Brown, and scores of others throughout our nation, we call for action, justice, and the transformation of our society,” the letter reads.

The statement calls for greater voter participation and replacing elected officials with others who “represent the preservation of life in ethnic communities where a disproportionate amount of killings, unsubstantiated sentencings, and jail time, are unwarranted means for perpetuating racism and bias against ethnic minorities.”

The whole article is here. You can read the statement from the clergy network here.

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