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Bishop John-David Schofield dies

Bishop John-David Schofield dies

Founding ACNA Bishop John-David Scholfield has died.

The Fresno Bee:

Retired Anglican bishop John-David Schofield, who in 2007 as bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of San Joaquin led a movement out of the U.S. Episcopal Church over debate about same-sex marriages and the consecration of a partnered gay priest, died early Tuesday. He was 75.

Current Anglican Bishop Eric Menees said on the diocese’s website that Schofield died peacefully at home sitting in his favorite green chair and was found Tuesday morning by friends.

Schofield had been in ill health for some time, said the Rev. Gordon Kamai, pastor of Anglican Christ Church in Oakhurst.

Schofield served 23 years as bishop before he retired in 2011. He remained as bishop in residence at the Anglican Diocese of San Joaquin, which is a diocese in the Anglican Church in North America. It was started after Schofield led a movement in which a majority of its congregants separated from the Episcopal Church.

Give rest, O Christ, to thy servant with thy saints,

where sorrow and pain are no more,

neither sighing, but life everlasting.

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tgflux

RIP.

God bless and defend the Episcopal Diocese of San Joaquin, and grant reconciliation, in God’s Time.

JC Fisher

John D

No mind the mischief. Rest in peace and rise in glory.

John Donnelly

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