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Bishop Anne Hodges-Copple on the shootings and protests in Charlotte

Bishop Anne Hodges-Copple on the shootings and protests in Charlotte

The Rt. Rev. Anne Hodges-Copple  of the Diocese of North Carolina speaks to the Diocese about Wednesday’s shooting of Keith Lamont Scott in Charlotte and the subsequent community response, both what has already happened and what is needed as we go forward.

A Word on Yesterday’s Shooting in Charlotte from The Episcopal Diocese of NC on Vimeo.

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Brent Schiffman

"Violence takes many forms: poverty; hate speech; war; institutional racism; slip shod housing; absent or inferior medical services; failing schools; militarized police departments; blue walls of silence; broken justice systems…and it goes on."

Actually the only listed item that is violent is "war".
Unless you are redefining the meaning of violence.

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Ann Fontaine

If you live in slipshod housing, experience hate speech, no medical care etc -- you would know these are destructive to life -- aka Violent acts.

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JC Fisher

"Actually the only listed item that is violent is “war”. Unless you are redefining the meaning of violence."

Two can play this game: in your attempt to narrowly limit violence to war, you are redefining the meaning of violence.

...OR, we can have a conversation. How do you experience violence, Bryan? What is it about Philip's list that bothers you? In what way is war violence to you, that these other violent harmful experiences aren't?

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Cynthia Katsarelis

No one is redefining violence. Attacks on one's well being is violence. Institutional racism is certainly violent and it begets physical violence.

As a gay person, I can tell you that hate speech is a violent psychic and spiritual assault.

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Brent Schiffman

So, if I call someone who redefines words to suit their own purposes, that would be "hate speech" and therefore I have committed a violent act?

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Philip B. Spivey

There can be no peace without justice in this land. This is the irrefutable fact that gets lost in our prayers for a better world.

Violence takes many forms: poverty; hate speech; war; institutional racism; slip shod housing; absent or inferior medical services; failing schools; militarized police departments; blue walls of silence; broken justice systems...and it goes on.

Authentic peace makers must do the work of change-makers. The only sustainable peace is the peace borne of reforming or dismantling the social structures that reinforce injustice. No body want's to talk about this kind of work it's easier to talk around it. But until the Beloved Community can focus primarily on holding the societal perpetraters (and benefactors of this violence) accountable, its victims will not be still. Nor should they be.

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Cynthia Katsarelis

That's why Jesus says "blessed are the peace makers." It seems so difficult to pull together people who will do the heavy lifting of working for justice. My faith community is center-left in sensibility, but won't do "anything political." That pretty much excludes working for justice and peace. I so wish our church would take up the mantle, together, in great numbers... And make a difference.

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