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Barker elected bishop of Nebraska

Barker elected bishop of Nebraska

The Rev. J. Scott Barker, Rector of Christ Church, Warwick, NY was elected the 11th Bishop of Nebraska today on the second ballot in a special election convention held at St. Mark’s Pro-Cathedral in Hastings.


Bishop-elect Barker’s background information is here.

(And on a personal note, as Scott was a contemporary of mine at Berkeley/YDS, “congratulations!” to Scott and the Diocese of Nebraska from this particular newsteam editor.)

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BraveMind Brave Mind

father barker

and his wife

are awesome

awesome

mark

Thanks for commenting Mark - please sign your last name too next time. ~ed.

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tobias haller

Congratulations indeed. Scott and I served together on the deputation to GC. Nebraska and he will be very good for each other, but we will miss him from NY.

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John D. Andrews

I listened and asked questions of all three candidates when they visited my church, Church of the Holy Trinity, here in Lincoln. After listening to all three and discussing what was said with other congregation members the following Sunday I was behind J. Scott Barker 100 per cent. The candidates were somewhat equal, except that Barker exhibited an entreprenuerial spirit which I believe our diocese needs. In fact, it is this spirit that is needed by TEC. I look forward with anticipation having him as the bishop in my diocese.

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