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A Question of Learning

“We spend our lives learning. Newborns have to learn to breathe and then to suck. The rest is progressive. Children want to know, so they ask, ‘Why?’ with seemingly every other breath. It’s their way of finding out how the world works, something they’re going to need to know, and, I think, they revel in learning about it.”

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Sin and Slavery

“During Lent, we reflect on our sins and work to overcome [sins] with God’s help and grace. We wear ashes on our foreheads on Ash Wednesday to outwardly show that we are inwardly contemplating our mortality – and probably morality as well.”

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The Example of Absolom Jones

“Christ has set us free so that we can stand firm against slavery. Sin is undoubtedly slavery, as much as we hate hearing it said. How often do we think about the things we do being hurtful to others before we act or say the words? Perhaps that is the problem of sin – it is often relatively easy to ignore the consequences.”

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Words in the Wind

“Jesus often spoke to large crowds, unaided by electronic devices to amplify sound. Crowds in Jesus’s day were accustomed to listening with care and attention. There was no media recording and replaying sound and video later.”

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Stormy Waters

Mark 4:35-41 One of the great things I remember about growing up was our town. I knew almost everybody who lived there, its history and

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Knowing the Truth

“‘Then Jesus said to the Jews who had believed in him, “If you continue in my word, you are truly my disciples; and you will know the truth, and the truth will set you free'” (John 8:31-2).  We hear the last part of that passage quite often, but many don’t recognize the source or that Jesus said it to Jewish believers.”

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Jesus and the Law

“Jesus called the disabled man over before turning to the Pharisees, asking, “Is it lawful to do good or to do harm on the sabbath, to save a life or to kill?” It wasn’t a question the Pharisees wanted to answer.”

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A Year and Vision

“If I were to gauge the past year (in my own opinion, of course), and if I were to put that gauge onto a Snellen opthalmological scale, I’d put it at about 20/200. I’d practically have to put my nose to the mirror to be able to see a clear reflection.”

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Stephen and Wenceslaus

“As we go walk the Christmas season and look forward to Epiphany, let us remember to give to others. It doesn’t necessarily have to be money or tangible goods; it can be a simple welcoming smile or hug, listening, helping with rides to doctor’s appointments, or meeting whatever need might present itself.”

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Leveling Mountains, Exalting Valleys

“Still, the metaphor of the mountains flattening and the valleys rising reminds me of how perhaps God wanted the earth to be: an even playing field with no rich and poor but only equals in every sense.”

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The Episcopal Café seeks to be an independent voice, reporting and reflecting on the Episcopal Church and the Anglican tradition.  The Café is not a platform of advocacy, but it does aim to tell the story of the church from the perspective of Progressive Christianity.  Our collective sympathy, as the Café, lies with the project of widening the circle of inclusion within the church and empowering all the baptized for the role to which they have been called as followers of Christ.

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