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Last Words

Last Words

“We’ve known death, Paul and I, and it struck us both afresh: here was Jesus, knowing what would happen the next day, spending the last night he will have on this earth with the rag-tag followers who have collected around him, loved him and been guided by him. They are still pretty oblivious, but he knows he has one final opportunity to teach them, leave them with something unforgettable. After all the long months, the healing, preaching, teaching and revelations are ending for him – think of his sense of urgency! He’s leaving his ministry to them to sustain the next day. There will be no do-overs. What is the most important thing he must convey, if his work is to bear fruit?”

Let Freedom Ring: A Reflection for Independence Day

Let Freedom Ring: A Reflection for Independence Day

“With a focus on Independence, I reflected on the contributions of America’s two greatest sons, George Washington, a master craftsperson in the forging of the United States and Martin Luther King, Jr., a master craftsperson in the ongoing effort to forge a united people.”

When Their Spiritual Memoir Becomes Part of My Faith’s Future

When Their Spiritual Memoir Becomes Part of My Faith’s Future

“All of my favorite spiritual memoirists are white women. The church communities that welcomed them are largely mainline Protestant ones (Kathleen Norris excepted). Those are, unsurprisingly, markers of my own identity. As influential as their voices have been in my own self-understanding, I might be identifying with these authors more than I am being stretched by my listening in.”

Respecting the Dignity

Respecting the Dignity

“In this passage, Jesus sets an example for us, showing us how we are to interact with others we encounter. This story is a reminder that as followers of Jesus we are called to treat our fellow human beings with respect. That means respecting others’ autonomy, personal space, and ability to speak for themselves. That means recognizing and trusting that people are experts on their own situation.”

Hagar and Ishmael are Cast Out

Hagar and Ishmael are Cast Out

“But I wonder if Hagar had nightmares. Nightmares of being forced to lie with her master. Nightmares  of death by heat exposure and thirst even after finding her new life in Paran. I wonder if Ishmael remembered the little brother he played with, who ended up with all the love of the father who loved Ishmael less. I wonder if the pain, the humiliation, the loss, the separation, the bitterness stayed with them.”

Five Poems from Said to Godhead Poems

Five Poems from Said to Godhead Poems

“I Said to Godhead:

The first rule of radio is that dead air freaks people out, makes them change the station. When there should be sound, and is none, is uncomfortable. Are you even listening to me? You can almost hear people straining their ears to hear you, to catch one note echoing back in reply to a prayer, a plea, a please. Do you even have a sound, a vibration? Pure silence is impossible to hear because our ears make a faint noise when listening—it is our eardrums humming a bit. Do I sound crazy because it’s the truth? It’s true—we can’t hear silence because our own bodies are so loud, our biology reminding us we’re not rotting, not yet. You must know that our ear drums continue to vibrate for a while after we’re dead. Is that you, finally?”

Mary Magdalene & the Enneagram

Mary Magdalene & the Enneagram

“There is a wonderful scene in Mary Magdalene, hoards have gathered, desperate, dirty, some maybe mentally ill, people in great need of hope and blessing. Jesus sends the Apostles out to bless them, and we follow them and especially Mary as they move among a crowd of humanity, blessing, never asking political affiliation, if they’d led blameless lives and where thus worthy, or how much money or social standing they had. They simply moved among their neighbors, listening, praying, and blessing. Being present, and bearing witness. It feels like a good example to me.”

Interfaith Leaders Join Episcopalian Bishop in a Call for Love in Action: Prayers for Justice

Interfaith Leaders Join Episcopalian Bishop in a Call for Love in Action: Prayers for Justice

“I want the church I lead to do our part, working with other faith communities, to bring some good out of the nightmare we’ve been in, to wrench grace from unspeakable tragedy, to make real and meaningful restitution for the sins of that past that are still visited on far too many, to rid however we can our institutions of embedded racism. Outrage is not enough. People of faith must unite in action to drive lasting change for justice and healing in our country.” 

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