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Author: Bill Carroll

Baptism: Mystery and Mission

Because of his baptism, water is forevermore a sign of his death and resurrection, of forgiveness, of discipleship, and of the gift of the Holy Spirit.  Truly, when we are washed in the font, Jesus himself baptizes us, with the Holy Spirit and with fire.

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Epiphany:  Nothing Can Stay the Same

Every birth—especially that of Jesus—is also a kind of death.  The arrival of a child disrupts our plans and ambitions and rearranges our priorities.  It shows us our need for each other.  It also shows us the true nature of power and authority, which is love.

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The Word Became Flesh

Christians have no monopoly on Truth.  And yet we do have a true testimony to the One who is the Truth.  For us, the Truth is not a rule book, nor a set of true doctrines, but a Person.

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Garments of Salvation

But vestments mean more than looking pretty, don’t they?  The beauty of our worship is meant to invite us to share in the beauty of God.  As the Psalm says, we are to “worship the Lord in the beauty of holiness.” 

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Showing the Way

I am convinced that we are all exiles (one way or another).  And so, we need GOD to show us the Way home.

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Come Lord Jesus

We ask God to help us overcome everything within us that divides us from God and each other—yes, even from our own true selves. 

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What is Truth?

The truth may not matter much to us—but it does matter to Jesus, who is himself the Truth.  And so, everyone who “belongs to the truth listens to his voice.”

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Unbind Him and Let Him Go

Christianity is about more than just being forgiven. When Jesus raises us from sin and death and makes us his friends, this is only the beginning of our lifelong journey into holiness and freedom.

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The Episcopal Café seeks to be an independent voice, reporting and reflecting on the Episcopal Church and the Anglican tradition.  The Café is not a platform of advocacy, but it does aim to tell the story of the church from the perspective of Progressive Christianity.  Our collective sympathy, as the Café, lies with the project of widening the circle of inclusion within the church and empowering all the baptized for the role to which they have been called as followers of Christ.

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