Support the Café
Search our site

Author: Andrew Gerns

Grieving the American Bible Society

Ever since my freshman year, I have toted around the same dog-eared, taped up, Revised Standard Version Bible that I bought in a college book store. It is an old friend, and I am deeply grateful to the American Bible Society for introducing us.  Now when I see it, there is a pang of hurt and heartbreak.

Read More »

Sing a song of God

I have a hunch that your favorite hymn is not only your favorite because it makes you tap your toes but that there is something about that hymn that is pointing you to how you enter into your relationship with God. Something about that hymn stirs something in you, pulls you, and takes you beyond yourself.

Read More »

This is no time to be cute

One must tread carefully on Ash Wednesday, because what is called up on this day most centered on penance is at once deeply personal and very core to our being and identity. We are acknowledging that we can’t go it alone. We recognize our limitedness. Together we will stare into our mortality. We will face the fact that we are broken. Ash Wednesday is all about sin.

Read More »

#JeSuisSEC

“I will do all I can to rebuild relationships, but that will be done from the position our Church has now reached in accordance with its synodical processes and in the belief that Love means Love.” – Bishop Mark Strange, Scottish Episcopal Church

Read More »

What’s Old is New Again (continued)

What I’ve found is a lot of kids who grew up in charismatic and evangelical churches were finding more relevance to their faith with things that were rooted and grounded in tradition, from Anglican to anything that had a liturgical, historical grounding to it.

Read More »
Page 1 of 100
1 2 3 100
Follow Us
Facebooktwitterrss
Support the Café
Past Posts
2020_001

The Episcopal Café seeks to be an independent voice, reporting and reflecting on the Episcopal Church and the Anglican tradition.  The Café is not a platform of advocacy, but it does aim to tell the story of the church from the perspective of Progressive Christianity.  Our collective sympathy, as the Café, lies with the project of widening the circle of inclusion within the church and empowering all the baptized for the role to which they have been called as followers of Christ.

The opinions expressed at the Café are those of individual contributors, and, unless otherwise noted, should not be interpreted as official statements of a parish, diocese or other organization. The art and articles that appear here remain the property of their creators.

All Content  © 2017 Episcopal Café