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Are you defending the status quo?

Are you defending the status quo?

Seth Godin reflects on the top signs that you may be defending the status quo. Is your church defending the status quo? Is this good? Did Jesus defend the status quo? Good food for thought and discussion.


The warning signs of defending the status quo

By Seth Godin at his blog

When confronted with a new idea, do you:

Consider the cost of switching before you consider the benefits?

Highlight the pain to a few instead of the benefits for the many?

Exaggerate how good things are now in order to reduce your fear of change?

Undercut the credibility, authority or experience of people behind the change?

Grab onto the rare thing that could go wrong instead of amplifying the likely thing that will go right?

Focus on short-term costs instead of long-term benefits, because the short-term is more vivid for you?

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Matthew Buterbaugh+

Not that I jump on board with every new idea, but generally I'd have to say 'no' to all those. Having said that, I see that pattern a lot.

I agree with Laura. The one building the tower is at least considering it and just seeing if it's feasible.

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LKT

But isn't the person sitting down to figure out if he can build a tower first saying to himself, "It would be great to build a tower! Now let's see if we can afford it."

Laura Toepfer

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Bill Dilworth

I'm a little confused with considering the cost referenced in a negative way.

"For which of you, intending to build a tower, sitteth not down first, and counteth the cost, whether he have sufficient to finish it?":

Bill Dilworth

Providence

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