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Are you interested in the history of the church?

Are you interested in the history of the church?

The Historical Society of the Episcopal Church is dedicated to preserving and disseminating information about the history of the Episcopal Church through promoting preservation, through publication of a scholarly journal and cooperation with other like-minded organizations.

They are planning to have a booth at General Convention and to host a Banquet on June 23rd with historian Philip Barlow as the featured speaker.  Philip Barlow is a Harvard-trained scholar specializing in American religious Barlow-Phil-349x450history. His research interests have ranged over American religious and historical geography, concepts of time in secular and religious society, and the problem of suffering and evil. The New Historical Atlas of Religion in America, co-authored with Edwin Scott Gaustad, examined the implications of religion’s connections with place and created hundreds of maps portraying the religious composition of the United States over time.

FYI, the price for the banquet goes up after June 12th, so register now if you are interested in preserving and promoting the history of the Episcopal Church

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