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Archbishops of Canterbury & York write primates, presidents on anti-gay laws in Nigeria, Uganda

Archbishops of Canterbury & York write primates, presidents on anti-gay laws in Nigeria, Uganda

From the Lambeth Palace press office:

The Archbishops of Canterbury and York have today written to all Primates of the Anglican Communion, and to the Presidents of Nigeria and Uganda, recalling the commitment made by the Primates of the Anglican Communion to the pastoral support and care of everyone worldwide, regardless of sexual orientation.


In their letter, the Archbishops recalled the words of the communiqué issued in 2005 after a meeting of Primates from across the Communion in Dromantine.

The text of the joint letter is as follows:

“Dear Brothers and Sisters in Christ

In recent days, questions have been asked about the Church of England’s attitude to new legislation in several countries that penalises people with same-sex attraction. In answer to these questions, we have recalled the common mind of the Primates of the Anglican Communion, as expressed in the Dromantine Communiqué of 2005.

The Communiqué said;

‘….we wish to make it quite clear that in our discussion and assessment of moral appropriateness of specific human behaviours, we continue unreservedly to be committed to the pastoral support and care of homosexual people.

The victimisation or diminishment of human beings whose affections happen to be ordered towards people of the same sex is anathema to us. We assure homosexual people that they are children of God, loved and valued by Him and deserving the best we can give – pastoral care and friendship.’

We hope that the pastoral care and friendship that the Communiqué described is accepted and acted upon in the name of the Lord Jesus.

We call upon the leaders of churches in such places to demonstrate the love of Christ and the affirmation of which the Dromantine communiqué speaks.

Yours in Christ

+Justin Cantuar +Sentamu Eboracensis

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Kurt

Too little too late.

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tgflux

I'll be honest: I was underwhelmed by +++Cantuar and ++York's response. Both for the time it took---and for the fact that, by the time their response was published, Nigerian Abp Okoh was already on record SUPPORTING this obscenity---and they didn't call him on it.

JC Fisher

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Bruce Garner

It's about time! And it took "asking questions" to get them to respond to something they should have immediately addressed. There were no qualms about not inviting Gene Robinson to the last Lambeth. Nor were there qualms about asking the Presiding Bishop and Primate of The Episcopal Church not to wear her episcopal mitre to a service. If the ABC is going to take a "position" it should be consistent across the communion, in my humble opinion.

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Marshall Scott

As I recall, Nigeria and Uganda were among the Anglican national churches calling on the Episcopal Church to see Dromantine as compelling. Seems not so much now. (And I won't be surprised if they blame that on us, too.)

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GrandmèreMimi

Good. Maybe signing petitions actually works.

June Butler

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