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Anne Lamott on getting beyond bunnies

Anne Lamott on getting beyond bunnies

Michele Norris of National Public Radio sat down to talk about Easter with Anne Lamott.

When asked how the meaning of Easter has changed for her over time, Lamott describes an experience that changed the meaning of the holiday for her:

“When I was 38, my best friend, Pammy, died, and we went shopping about two weeks before she died, and she was in a wig and a wheelchair. I was buying a dress for this boyfriend I was trying to impress, and I bought a tighter, shorter dress than I was used to. And I said to her, ‘Do you think this makes my hips look big?’ and she said to me, so calmly, ‘Anne, you don’t have that kind of time.’ And I think Easter has been about the resonance of that simple statement; and that when I stop, when I go into contemplation and meditation, when I breathe again and do the sacred action of plopping and hanging my head and being done with my own agenda, I hear that, ‘You don’t have that kind of time,’ you have time only to cultivate presence and authenticity and service, praying against all odds to get your sense of humor back.”

“That’s how it has changed for me,” Lamott continues. “That was the day my life changed, when she said that to me.”

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Claire Carter

I love that. I couldn't agree more with her friend who made the remark, and I thank Anne for sharing that story.

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