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Anglicans praised for refugee work

Anglicans praised for refugee work

Churches in Uganda and South Sudan are working to assist refugees from the crisis in South Sudan:

From Anglican Communion News Service:

The Diocese of Northern Uganda has been praised by the country’s armed forces for its crisis response in support for the thousands of refugees streaming into the country from South Sudan.

More than 38,000 people have reported fled from South Sudan in the past week, including Kenyans and Rwandans. South Sudanese nationals fleeing the violence were received in Elegu and transferred to the Refugee Camp in Adjumani.

The refugees are being transported in a 3 km-long convoy under police and army escort to provide security from rebel activity.

On Friday, the diocese responded to the crisis with an emergency mobilisation of support people providing refugees with water, biscuits, and medical kits. A small medical team from the diocese’s St Philip’s Health Centre provided emergency first aid, while an ambulance was provided to help those seriously injured.

More on the crisis in Sudan and the work of Anglican churches in Uganda and Sudan and South Sudan here.

 

Photo Credit: Church of Uganda

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