Anglican Standing Committee weighs in on L.A. election

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The Inter-Anglican Standing Commission on Unity Faith and Order has issued a Communiqué on the Covenant and weighs in on the election in Los Angeles of Mary Glasspool but says nothing about the proposed laws in Uganda.

The Commission devoted this first meeting to developing a vision that gives expression to its mandate. It sees its role as being a communicative and connection-making body which models and promotes communication and connection-making in the Anglican Communion, within a confident and vibrant expression of our shared faith and life, participating by God’s grace in the One Holy Catholic and Apostolic Church of Jesus Christ.

From the Inter-Anglican Standing Commission on Unity Faith and Order Communiqué:

In addition to outlining areas of longer-term work, the Commission committed itself to five immediate tasks:

1. to undertake a reflection on the Instruments of Communion and relationships among them;

2. to make a study of the definition and recognition of ‘Anglican Churches’ and develop guidelines for bishops in the Communion;

3. to provide supporting material to assist in promoting the Anglican Covenant;

4. to draft proposals for guided processes of ‘reception’ (how developments and agreements are evaluated, and how appropriate insights are brought into the life of the churches);

5. to consider the question of ‘transitivity’ (how ecumenical agreements in one region or Province may apply in others).

These tasks, which will be taken forward by working groups consulting electronically between meetings, aim to strengthen the unity, faith and order of the Communion.

An Episcopal election in Los Angeles, which remains to be confirmed or rejected by The Episcopal Church, took place during the meeting and was discussed by the Commission. It noted the words of the Archbishop of Canterbury that ‘the bishops of the Communion have collectively acknowledged that a period of gracious restraint in respect of actions which are contrary to the mind of the Communion is necessary if our bonds of mutual affection are to hold’. The Commission expressed the fervent hope that ‘gracious restraint’ would be exercised by The Episcopal Church in this instance.

h/t to Kendall Harmon at Titus One Nine.

Statement below:

Too bad they could not make time to say something about the horrific proposed laws in Uganda.

Grateful for the gracious guidance of the Holy Spirit, the Inter-Anglican Standing Commission on Unity, Faith and Order held its first meeting in Canterbury, England from 1 to 8 December 2009.

The Commission has been established by the Lambeth Conference, the Primates’ Meeting, and the Anglican Consultative Council. It builds on previous work done by the Inter-Anglican Theological and Doctrinal Commission, the Inter-Anglican Standing Commission on Ecumenical Relations, and the Windsor Continuation Group. It reports to the Standing Committee of the Anglican Communion.

The Commission devoted this first meeting to developing a vision that gives expression to its mandate. It sees its role as being a communicative and connection-making body which models and promotes communication and connection-making in the Anglican Communion, within a confident and vibrant expression of our shared faith and life, participating by God’s grace in the One Holy Catholic and Apostolic Church of Jesus Christ.

In addition to outlining areas of longer-term work, the Commission committed itself to five immediate tasks:

to undertake a reflection on the Instruments of Communion and relationships among them;

to make a study of the definition and recognition of ‘Anglican Churches’ and develop guidelines for bishops in the Communion;

to provide supporting material to assist in promoting the Anglican Covenant;

to draft proposals for guided processes of ‘reception’ (how developments and agreements are evaluated, and how appropriate insights are brought into the life of the churches);

to consider the question of ‘transitivity’ (how ecumenical agreements in one region or Province may apply in others).

These tasks, which will be taken forward by working groups consulting electronically between meetings, aim to strengthen the unity, faith and order of the Communion.

An Episcopal election in Los Angeles, which remains to be confirmed or rejected by The Episcopal Church, took place during the meeting and was discussed by the Commission. It noted the words of the Archbishop of Canterbury that ‘the bishops of the Communion have collectively acknowledged that a period of gracious restraint in respect of actions which are contrary to the mind of the Communion is necessary if our bonds of mutual affection are to hold’. The Commission expressed the fervent hope that ‘gracious restraint’ would be exercised by The Episcopal Church in this instance.

Members of the Commission were enriched by sharing accounts of the life of the Anglican Church in each of their own contexts. The Commission also greatly valued an afternoon spent with the Archbishop of Canterbury, during which he shared his own vision for the work of the Commission and his hope that it might act creatively in addressing vital issues for the Church and the world.

Canterbury Cathedral sustained the Commission throughout the meeting through its ministry of prayer and hospitality. The Commission was also strengthened by sharing in daily Eucharist and in Bible study. The Commission is grateful for the hospitality of the International Study Centre and the Dean and Chapter of the Cathedral; of the Archbishop of Canterbury and the staff of Lambeth Palace; and of the Nikaean Club which hosted a dinner at Lambeth. The Commission also expressed its gratitude to the staff of the Anglican Communion Office.

The next meeting will take place at the end of November 2010 in Cape Town, South Africa.

Participants:

The Most Revd Bernard Ntahoturi, Primate of Burundi and Chair of Commission

The Rt Revd Dr Georges Titre Ande, Congo

The Ven. Professor Dapo Asaju, Nigeria

The Revd Canon Professor Paul Avis, England

The Rt Revd Philip D Baji, Tanzania

The Revd Canon Dr John Gibaut, World Council of Churches

The Rt Revd Howard Gregory, West Indies

The Revd Dr Katherine Grieb, Episcopal Church (USA)

The Revd Canon Clement Janda, Sudan

The Revd Sarah Rowland Jones, Southern Africa

The Revd Dr Edison Muhindo Kalengyo, Uganda

The Rt Revd Victoria Matthews, Aotearoa, New Zealand and Polynesia

The Revd Canon Dr Charlotte Methuen, England

The Revd Dr Simon Oliver, Wales/England

The Rt Revd Professor Stephen Pickard, Australia

Dr Andrew Pierce, Ireland

The Revd Canon Dr Michael Nai Chiu Poon, South East Asia

The Revd Dr Jeremiah Guen Seok Yang, Korea

The Rt Revd Tito Zavala, Bishop of Chile, Southern Cone

The Revd Joanna Udal, the Archbishop of Canterbury’s Secretary for Anglican Communion Affairs

The Revd Canon Dr Alyson Barnett-Cowan, Director for Unity, Faith and Order

Mr Neil Vigers, of the Anglican Communion Office.

_____

TAGS: Glasspool

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11 Responses to "Anglican Standing Committee weighs in on L.A. election"
  1. Without diminishing the atrocity of the proposed legislation in Uganda is it not a bit different since it is the Ugandan State contemplating these laws and not the Ugandan Anglican church?

    Anthony Dale Hunt

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  2. Anthony, there _are_ clergy in the Church of Uganda who have spoken out in _support_ of the law. One is on the faculty of the same Uganda Christian University as the member of the standing committee listed above.

    See: https://www.episcopalcafe.com/lead/anglican_communion/anglican_funeral_ocassion_for.html

    The other is Bishop Joseph Abura of Karamoja Diocese

    see: https://www.episcopalcafe.com/lead/anglican_communion/ugandan_anglican_bishop_pushes.html

    The Church of Uganda's only position on the bill is to oppose the capital punishment portion (because they oppose capital punishment period).

    See: https://www.episcopalcafe.com/lead/anglican_communion/the_church_of_uganda_response.html

    But shortly after that PR statement the spokesperson for the Church said pretty plainly that he supported the bill.

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  3. Thanks Roger for the courteous response. I was honestly asking a question that John Chilton was generous enough to answer for me as I did not know the in's and out's of the situation.

    As I recall I even called the legislation an atrocity.

    A D Hunt

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  4. All right, I'll say it: I believe that if "preserving the Anglican Communion" is more important than preventing the harm that would result from the passage the legislation in Uganda, then the line has been crossed between preservation and

    idolatry.

    Prayers are in order for all who might have any influence over this bill, especially the Archbishops of Canterbury and York. May they be open and receptive to hearing and doing the will of God in this and all matters in their purviews.

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  5. When did we start calling the Joint Standing Committee “the Standing Committee of the Anglican Communion?”)?

    Marshall Scott

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  6. To comment further: I believe that events around us (one of them being the election of Bishop-elect Glasspool) will overtake even their efforts to respond to "immediate" issues.

    Marshall Scott

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  7. I hate to say this, but maybe we should take this as a cue to part ways. I'm doubting my own desire to be in the same communion with people who seems to be more concerned with our inclusiveness than other members' exclusivity.

    I don't think the communion is totally a lost cause, but I'm getting close to moving that way. We don't need to kowtow to those who would criticize our following the gospel while being complacent in or promoting possible atrocities.

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  8. If we are doing God's Will, why do we believe that we will be hailed for it? Consider Jesus' track record, but also consider Easter morning.

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  9. @ Peter Pearson

    "Blessed are you when men curse you and revile you and speak all manner of evil about you for my sake. Rejoice and be exceedingly glad..."

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