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Anglican Church of Canada considers what a “No” to the Anglican Covenant means

Anglican Church of Canada considers what a “No” to the Anglican Covenant means

From the Anglican Journal:

The Anglican Church of Canada needs more clarity around what the “relational consequences” would be for not adopting the proposed Anglican Communion Covenant.

At their spring meeting May 24 to May 27, CoGS members were asked to weigh in on what the report should contain. Bishops were asked for input at their spring meeting, noted Archbishop Fred Hiltz, primate of the Anglican Church of Canada.

Emerging from small group discussions, some CoGs members said there’s a lot of uncertainty around what happens when a province decides to adopt or not adopt the covenant. Critics of the covenant have long warned that adopting it could result in a two-tier Communion.

Although a comprehensive study guide on the covenant was prepared and recommended for Canadian Anglicans, “there’s not much interest in discussing it,” reported members of one CoGS discussion group. “We’re not sure why,” they added.

The House of Bishops would like to include a message that the church wants to continue being engaged in the life of the Communion, regardless of whether or not there’s a covenant. There are a variety of ways to do this, noted Hiltz, including companion relationships with overseas dioceses and taking part in the continuing indaba (purposeful dialogue) process.

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Rod Gillis

As a Canadian Anglican I find this bit interesting,

"Although a comprehensive study guide on the covenant was prepared and recommended for Canadian Anglicans, 'there’s not much interest in discussing it,'reported members of one CoGS discussion group. 'We’re not sure why,' they added.

Gee! Let me think, perhaps because (1) Hardly anyone in my Province in Canada has seen or heard of the study guide (2) Ye olde C of E has already scuttled the thing (thankfully!)and (3) The ongoing crisis around nose diving demographics and deficit finances in Canada is a more pressing problem.

It all Makes the following question rather moot,

"...some CoGs members said there’s a lot of uncertainty around what happens when a province decides to adopt or not adopt the covenant?"

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Dave Paisley

So the ACC hasn't noticed that the Church of England rejected the covenant?

I think I'd be ok being in the same second tier as the mother church.

Besides, why don't they just be adults and vote on the merits ( or lack therof) of the covenant and let the chips fall where they may, instead of wondering what the playground bullies might do?

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Ann Fontaine

or check out Drexel Gomez, one of the authors of the Covenant, and Archbishop of the West Indies which includes Jamaica - one of the most dangerous countries for gay and lesbian persons.

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E B

P.S. Obadiah, I am assuming your handle is a nom de plume per Barchester Towers. If that is the case, please sign your real name, as do the rest of us.

Eric Bonetti

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E B

Hi Obadiah. You may wish to read the Guardian's account of local Anglican support for the Ugandan anti-homosexuality bill, which as introduced called for imposition of the death penalty against sexula minorities. The church in Uganda, via Archbishop Henry Luke Orombi, has expressed its "strong support" for the measure. Guardian article at: http://is.gd/LEsgH0. Original source of the archbishop's letter in PDF:http://is.gd/PJhvOe

Eric Bonetti

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