2021_001_A

Support the Café

Search our Site

Correction: following record new Covid-19 cases, Diocese of Mississippi re-suspends in-person worship

Correction: following record new Covid-19 cases, Diocese of Mississippi re-suspends in-person worship

Correction: The original post referred to record deaths. What is correct is record new infections. The author regrets the error.

UPDATED 12/7 (where italicized) to direct the reader to the in-person worship policies in the diocese that were in place, and the timing of changes to those policies.

UPDATED 12/8 (in blue).

The Rt. Rev. Brian Seage, Bishop of the Diocese of Mississippi, waited until announced— as the state reached a record number of new cases deaths due to Covid-19to a return to suspension of suspend in-person worship. His letter to the diocese appears at the end of this post.

The Hour’s report on new case levels and the Seage’s announcement is here.

The data

Data for Mississippi from the New York Times are displayed below. The data go up to December 7:

Hospitalizations are a leading indicator of future death rates. High hospitalization rates imply pressure on ICU beds and hospital staff.

From the Mississippi State Department of Health:

Mississippi Today reported on 12/8

Thirteen major hospitals are without ICU capacity, according to this week’s health department numbers. Currently, 86% of the state’s ICU beds are full — including 96% capacity among the highest level COVID-care centers — and COVID-19 patients are filling 30% of those spots.

Evolution of the diocese’s worship restrictions

The diocese’s Covid-19 Resources page is here. Letters from the bishop and diocesan news on Covid-19 can be found here. On March 13 worship services were temporarily suspended and later the suspension of in-person worship was extended, and again and again — all for a few weeks at a time. In the bishop’s July 13 letter he issued this directive: “all Parishes and Missions shall restrict worshiping bodies to no more than 10 people indoors and 20 people out of doors” (plus safety protocols, and allowance for local hot spots). His September 2 letter relaxed that the July 13 policy, allowing in-person worship at 50% provided seating permitted 6 feet of social distance. 

At present, does your diocese allow in-person worship?

Seage’s December 2, 2020 letter to the diocese follows.


1 2 votes
Article Rating
Facebooktwitterpinterestlinkedinmail

Café Comments?

Our comment policy requires that you use your real first and last names and provide an email address (your email will not be published). Comments that use non-PG rated language, include personal attacks, that are not provable as fact or that we deem in any way to be counter to our mission of fostering respectful dialogue will not be posted.

20 Comments
Newest
Oldest Most Voted
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Michael Smith

I wonder if the schoolmarmy condescension in this article would have been so thick if the state in question weren’t one that is too often the butt of Northeastern elitist humor?

Al Underwood

From your “about us” –“The Café is not a platform of advocacy, but it does aim to tell the story of the church from the perspective of Progressive Christianity” ……ANOTHER EXAMPLE of “progressive (liberal) all knowing holier than thou condescension…without the facts.

David johnson

I wonder if anyone associated with the posting of this misstated, superficial story has ever had to deal with the soul-crushing decisions a Bishop has to make. It’s “damned if you do and damned if you don’t.” There are always second-guessers. Read Teddy Roosevelt’s “Man in the Arena.”

David Johnson

Thank you for the clarification and greater detail. However, your article continues the misleading thrust with these words: “The Rt. Rev. Brian Seage, Bishop of the Diocese of Mississippi, waited until the state reached a record number of death due to Covid-19 to suspend in-person worship.” The irony is that the following paragraph completely debunks that erroneous statement. Eliminate that sentence and you have a more accurate article.

David johnson

Just face it — you misstated the essence of the truth. You did not seek the truth. You missed the facts behind the story. You went with a superficial story line. Admit it. Stick to economics.

Jeannie Johnson

Just wondering…did Episcopal Cafe reach out to get a comment from The Diocese of Mississippi before publishing this article?

David johnson

So, you report unchecked, unverified interpretations of “facts” (your word).”?That doesn’t say much for the credibility of Episcopal Cafe. BTW, OAN has some great story lines you might want to pursue without checking the accuracy. Again, stick with economics.

Jamie Dickson

I’m gonna guess not. But they sure got some comments now!!

Facebooktwitterrss
Support the Café
Past Posts
2021_002

The Episcopal Café seeks to be an independent voice, reporting and reflecting on the Episcopal Church and the Anglican tradition.  The Café is not a platform of advocacy, but it does aim to tell the story of the church from the perspective of Progressive Christianity.  Our collective sympathy, as the Café, lies with the project of widening the circle of inclusion within the church and empowering all the baptized for the role to which they have been called as followers of Christ.

The opinions expressed at the Café are those of individual contributors, and, unless otherwise noted, should not be interpreted as official statements of a parish, diocese or other organization. The art and articles that appear here remain the property of their creators.

All Content  © 2017 Episcopal Café