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‘Africa for Norway’ mocks international aid tactics

‘Africa for Norway’ mocks international aid tactics

A group of South African students and an aid agency in Norway have created a video that’s gone viral, gently poking fun at stereotypes about international aid efforts. “Africa for Norway” is funny, but, according to its creators’ Web site, they mean to make a serious point.


From africafornorway.no:

Imagine if every person in Africa saw the “Africa for Norway” video and this was the only information they ever got about Norway. What would they think about Norway?

If we say Africa, what do you think about? Hunger, poverty, crime or AIDS? No wonder, because in fundraising campaigns and media that’s mainly what you hear about.

The pictures we usually see in fundraisers are of poor African children. Hunger and poverty is ugly, and it calls for action. But while these images can engage people in the short term, we are concerned that many people simply give up because it seems like nothing is getting better. Africa should not just be something that people either give to, or give up on.

The truth is that there are many positive developments in African countries, and we want these to become known. We need to change the simplistic explanations of problems in Africa. We need to educate ourselves on the complex issues and get more focus on how western countries have a negative impact on Africa’s development. If we want to address the problems the world is facing we need to do it based on knowledge and respect. …

What do we want?

— Fundraising should not be based on exploiting stereotypes.

Most of us just get tired if all we see is sad pictures of what is happening in the world, instead of real changes.

— We want better information about what is going on in the world, in schools, in TV and media.

We want to see more nuances. We want to know about positive developments in Africa and developing countries, not only about crises, poverty and AIDS. We need more attention on how western countries have a negative impact on developing countries.

— Media: Show respect.

Media should become more ethical in their reporting. Would you print a photo of a starving white baby without permission? The same rules must apply when journalists are covering the rest of the world as it does when they are in their home country.

— Aid must be based on real needs, not “good” intentions.

Aid is just one part of a bigger picture; we must have cooperation and investments, and change other structures that hold back development in poorer countries. Aid is not the only answer

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APJ

If we as Christians in different countries claim to be partners in the Gospel then we need to think how partnership works financially and how our relationships inspire each others mission. More here http://continuingindaba.com/2012/11/30/africa-for-norway/

APJ

APJ– please sign your name when you comment – thanks ~ed.

John B. Chilton

Tyler describes this as the Christmas Present problem (and more).

http://mruniversity.com/knowledge-problems-and-incentive-problems

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