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A Miracle: Church of the Nativity in Bethlehem to be restored

A Miracle: Church of the Nativity in Bethlehem to be restored

The three Christian groups who claim ancient church will collaborate on restoration according to Religion News Service:

In what some are calling the biggest miracle in Bethlehem since the birth of Jesus, the three churches that share responsibility for the Nativity church put aside centuries of tense relations this past year to ensure the job gets done.

In an act of diplomatic prowess, the Palestinian Authority persuaded the Latin (Roman Catholic), Greek Orthodox and Apostolic Armenian churches to sign an agreement permitting the restoration of the church, whose basilica was built by the Byzantine Emperor Justinian about 600 A.D.

The original Church of the Nativity, built in A.D. 330 by the Roman Emperor Constantine, was mostly destroyed 200 years later. The existing church was built on the same site. Rainwater has been damaging the church’s infrastructure and artwork for more than a century, but infighting over which church has authority prevented a resolution.

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Donna Hicks

Just want to say that Al Jazeera America has had some solid coverage on Bethlehem today – more honest and complete about the situation on the ground than what one finds on CNN et al.

Happy Christmas everyone!

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