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A long ways to go to eradicate racism

A long ways to go to eradicate racism

AP has released its latest poll on prejudice in the U.S and the news is bad:

Racial prejudice has increased slightly since 2008 whether those feelings were measured using questions that explicitly asked respondents about racist attitudes, or through an experimental test that measured implicit views toward race without asking questions about that topic directly.

In all, 51 percent of Americans now express explicit anti-black attitudes, compared with 48 percent in a similar 2008 survey. When measured by an implicit racial attitudes test, the number of Americans with anti-black sentiments jumped to 56 percent, up from 49 percent during the last presidential election. In both tests, the share of Americans expressing pro-black attitudes fell.

“As much as we’d hope the impact of race would decline over time … it appears the impact of anti-black sentiment on voting is about the same as it was four years ago,” said Jon Krosnick, a Stanford University professor who worked with AP to develop the survey.

Most Americans expressed anti-Hispanic sentiments, too. In an AP survey done in 2011, 52 percent of non-Hispanic whites expressed anti-Hispanic attitudes. That figure rose to 57 percent in the implicit test. The survey on Hispanics had no past data for comparison.

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Daniel Robayo

Racism & its close sibling Class-ism are still very much the unnamed elephants in the national living room. New code language emerges all the time to mask it (e.g.,"well, the Episcopal Church can't possibly be everyone's cup of tea"). To which I say, Absolutely true--but should we be the ones to decide that for ___?

I have yet to experience a conversation on racial reconciliation that wasn't packed with tense defensiveness.

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