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A change in tone & tactics in Ferguson

A change in tone & tactics in Ferguson

Governor Jay Nixon has put the Missouri Highway Patrol in charge of security in Ferguson, Missouri and appointed Captain Ronald S. Johnson, who grew up in the area, to lead the effort. Johnson immediately ordered the removal of the military-style presence and an end to confrontational tactics.

Washington Post:

“When I see a young lady cry because of fear of this uniform, that’s a problem.” Johnson said. “We’ve got to solve that.”

And the difference from protests at similar times in the evening on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday was massive. By this time on Wednesday, police had detained protesters, by this point on Monday officers had begun deploying tear-gas canisters at residents who would not disperse.

Johnson hugged and kissed community members as they passed, slapping backs and sharing laughs.

One man stopped, telling Capt. Johnson that his niece had been tear gassed earlier this week – “What would you say to her?”

Johnson reached out his hand and replied: “Tell her Capt. Johnson is sorry and he apologizes.”

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