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A Calvinist revival?

A Calvinist revival?

Mark Oppenheimer writes that evangelicals are in the midst of a Calvinist revival.

For those who are sad that the year-end news quizzes are past, here’s one to start 2014: If you have joined a church that preaches a Tulip theology, does that mean a) the pastor bakes flowers into the communion wafers, b) the pastor believes that flowers that rise again every spring symbolize the resurrection, or c) the pastor is a Calvinist?

As an increasing number of Christians know, the answer is “c.” The acronym summarizes John Calvin’s so-called doctrines of grace, with their emphasis on sinfulness and predestination. The T is for man’s Total Depravity. The U is for Unconditional Election, which means that God has already decided who will be saved, without regard to any condition in them, or anything they can do to earn their salvation.

The acronym gets no cheerier from there.

Is this a good thing? I don’t know, but it does give me a chance to remind everyone that they should read Marilynne Robinson, who may make you rethink your views on Calvin.

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JohnRobison

There is a considerable difference between Calvin (for whom the doctrine of predestination was an increasingly small part of his theology ) and the later Calvinistic theology of the Synod of Dort from whence the TULIP more directly derives.

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