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A journey of faith, hope, and integrity

A journey of faith, hope, and integrity

Emmie Smith’s journey, along with her family, through gender reassignment surgery.

Nina Strochlic and photographer Lynn Johnson of the National Geographic tell a story of love, courage, and faith.

It had been a year and a half since Emmie had first come out as a transgender woman on Facebook. Telling her family and friends had been an enormous relief. “I’m not sure I could have taken another few years of being closeted,” she says.

Still, it was a challenging time for her family. Her mother, Reverend Kate Malin, is a prominent figure in their Massachusetts town, and her identical twin sons Caleb and Walker were familiar fixtures at her Episcopal church. A month after Walker came out as Emmie, Malin stepped out from behind her pulpit and walked into the aisle. Halfway through her sermon she decided it was time to address the change in her family.

“As most of you know, Bruce and I have three children,” she began. “Caleb and Walker, who are 17, and 13-year-old Owen. Walker’s new name is Emerson, and she prefers Emmie or Em. She’s wearing feminine clothing and makeup and will likely continue to move in the direction of a more feminized body.”

Read the rest here.

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JC Fisher

Thank you for this. God bless and protect Emmie, and the entire Malin family. Sharing their story could well save lives. TBTG!

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