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Archbishop of Wales to retire January 2017

Archbishop of Wales to retire January 2017

Anglican Communion News Service reports:

The longest serving Primate in the Anglican Communion, Archbishop of Wales Dr Barry Morgan, will retire at the end of January on his 70th birthday, it was announced today (Tuesday). Dr Morgan has served the Church in Wales as a bishop for 24 years – the last 14 of them as Archbishop….

“It has been an enormous privilege to serve as Archbishop of Wales and Bishop of Llandaff and to do so during such a momentous era in Welsh life,” Dr Morgan said. “It’s been a rollercoaster ride but all along I have been sustained and inspired by the people I meet, day in day out, who live out God’s love in every part of Wales through their commitment and devotion to their churches and communities.”

Archbishop Morgan’s retirement will come just over a year after the death of his wife Hilary from cancer. “I would like to thank all those who have supported, shared and upheld me in my ministry over the years, particularly since Hilary’s death – the loss of her love, encouragement and friendship has been enormously hard to bear,” he said….

During his tenure as Archbishop, Dr Morgan has championed many changes in the Church in Wales, including a change in its law to enable women to be ordained as bishops and the implementation of a radical strategy, 2020 Vision, to help the church grow and prosper in the approach to its centenary year. He has also played a prominent role in public life, campaigning most notably for a fair devolution settlement for the Welsh Government and speaking out on matters of moral concern.

Read more here.

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