Day: February 20, 2015

The vicar of Grantchester and the wrong whiskey

The vicar of Grantchester and the wrong whiskey

Fans of the PBS series Grantchester will have noticed that vicar-sleuth, Sidney Chambers, has a taste for whiskey and ale. But not sherry, which people assume must be the vicar’s drink of choice. He drinks to get drunk at upper-class dinner parties with Amanda and her set, and with the detective Geordie Keating at the pub. Alcohol […]

Why Anti-racism training?

Why Anti-racism training?

The Executive Council Committee on Anti-racism (ECCAR) is meeting this week in St. Louis including a visit to Ferguson with the Bishop, young adults, and others working for reconciliation. Representatives from the nine provinces of the Episcopal Church (TEC) and the Episcopal Church Missioner for Racial Reconciliation, Heidi Kim, from the national church staff (she is based in Seattle and […]

New ways to minister to new kinds of students

New ways to minister to new kinds of students

The way students earn university degrees in the United States is changing and Episcopal Church campus ministries are responding creatively. Episcopal News Service: Examples of that innovation, supported by grants from the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society, include an interfaith ministry at a state commuter college, a combination food truck and chapel that will visit […]

Keeping up with evolution of marriage

Keeping up with evolution of marriage

Brian Tammaus says that all churches should do as the Episcopal Church is doing: study, think, pray, and talk about marriage and sexuality in real-life terms. National Catholic Reporter: Marriage, in fact, has been evolving for tens of thousands of years and has taken various forms in various cultures. As Steven Mintz, a Columbia University […]

Speaking to the Soul: Everything’s Under Control

Imagine if that were the priority of Christians everywhere: the pursuit of real freedom from all the substances, stereotypes, and systems that enslave us. Imagine if it weren’t acceptable to plead that we were simply “unable” to recognize the signs that someone in our sphere of responsibility, or merely in our midst, was enslaved in the ways that the Scripture warns us about. Imagine if we couldn’t claim that we simply didn’t have the right information, or that our processes were faulty.