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12 Ways to be a White Ally to Black People

12 Ways to be a White Ally to Black People

Wondering what you as a white person can do to change the racism in the U.S.”

The Root names 12 ways to be a white ally:


1. Learn about the racialized history of Ferguson and how it reflects the racialized history of America.

2. Reject the “He was a good kid” or “He was a criminal” narrative and lift up the “Black lives matter” narrative.

3. Use words that speak the truth about the disempowerment, oppression, disinvestment and racism that are rampant in our communities.

4. Understand the modern forms of race oppression and slavery and how they are intertwined with policing, the courts and the prison-industrial complex.

5. Examine the interplay between poverty and racial equity.

6. Diversify your media.

7. Adhere to the philosophy of nonviolence as you resist racism and oppression.

8. Find support from fellow white allies.

9. If you are a person of faith, look to your Scriptures or other holy texts for guidance.

10. Don’t be afraid to be unpopular.

11. Be proactive in your own community.

12. Don’t give up. We’re 400 years into this racist system, and it’s going to take decades—centuries, probably—to dismantle. The anti-racism movement is a struggle for generations, not simply the hot-button issue of the moment. Transformation of a broken system doesn’t happen quickly or easily. You may not see or feel the positive impact of your white allyship during the next month, the next year, the next decade or even your lifetime. But don’t ever stop. Being a white ally matters because you will be part of what turns the tide someday. Change starts with the individual.

Read the full explanations of the 12 Ways here.

Ideas for other ways to be an ally from Velveteen Rabbi are here

More ideas from the Very Rev. Mike Kinman

Add yours in the comments or on Facebook.

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