Orombi tires of dysfunctionality

Updated. The Archbishop of the Church of Uganda, Henry Luke Orombi told the members of the three-day provincial Assembly in Mukono, Uganda that the Anglican Church is “broken” and that the Church of Uganda should participate in it at very minimal levels.

The Daily Monitor reports:

“What I can tell you is that the Anglican Church is very broken,” Bishop Orombi said.

“It (church) has been torn at its deepest level, and it is a very dysfunctional family of the provincial churches. It is very sad for me to see how far down the church has gone.” Speaking at the opening of a three-day provincial Assembly in Mukono, the head of the Church of Uganda noted that the church has lost credibility.

He proposed that the Church of Uganda engages church structures at a very minimal level until godly faith and order have been restored. “I can assure you that we have tried as a church to participate in the processes, but they are dominated by western elites, whose main interest is advancing a vision of Anglicanism that we do not know or recognise. We are a voice crying in the wilderness,” he said at the Church’s top assembly that convenes every two years.

I

Translation: Since the Episcopal Church was not thrown out on its ear, and since the alternative churches in the USA that I put my church’s money and reputation behind are not recognized , and since the alternative international groups I’ve led my church into have not gained traction, I will not therefore participate in Anglican Communion groups or programs where I can’t be guaranteed I will always get my way. Because it’s broken.

But not so broken that he won’t accept American money. Stephen Bates of the Guardian notes that Orombi may have trouble interacting with other churches because of gay clerics, but he has no trouble accepting money from Trinity, Wall Street.

African Anglican bishops have long forsworn any contact with the US Episcopal church for its temerity in electing an openly gay bishop, and that goes for their filthy, tainted dollars as well. You can never tell where they’ve been. So it comes as something of a surprise to see who’s sponsoring the bishops’ meeting in Kampala this month: Trinity Church, Wall Street, New York. Trinity, probably the richest parish church in the world, is giving $1.4m, mostly to Africa, this quarter, including $25,000 to underwrite the gathering, to be attended by Rowan Williams. This is odd, because Henry Orombi, the archbishop of Uganda, is one of the church’s fiercest critics of gays, so much so that he claims he can’t walk down the street without being confronted by them. He claims: “The team of homosexuals is very rich … they have money and will do whatever it takes to make sure this vice penetrates Africa.” In the past he has ordered members of his church to have nothing to do with Trinity’s money because of the Americans’ “unrepentant attitude” to gay people and Americans’ “determined imperialism to impose their views”. But needs must – how else would the continent’s 400 bishops get to Uganda in reasonable comfort to hear Orombi’s anathemas?

Update h/t to MadPriest.

In a report on August 3rd about the Trinity grants, The Lead reported:

Although Trinity’s grant is to CAPA, and not directly to the Church of Uganda it is worth noting that in 2006 Orombi wrote in a pastoral letter,

We will no longer apply for grants from the Trinity Grants program of Trinity Wall Street, UTO (United Thank Offering), Episcopal Relief and Development (ERD), or scholarships through the Episcopal Church Center (815). No Bishop or Diocesan Secretary should sign grant applications to these organizations.

In 2008 Orombi said gays threatened his life, he was forced to dress in street clothes to avoid notice by them, and he said, “The team of homosexuals is very rich. … They have money and will do whatever it takes to make sure that this vice penetrates Africa.”

Category : The Lead

Comment Policy
Our comment policy requires that you use your real name and provide an email address (your email will not be published). Comments that use non-PG rated language, include personal attacks, that are not provable as fact or that we deem in any way to to be counter to our mission of fostering respectful dialogue will not be posted

4 Comments
  1. Dä'ved Äyan | David Allen

    It would be relevant at this moment for folks from Trinity Wall Street to perhaps enlighten us as to why they would offer grant money to allow Orombi to further propagate his lies, bigotry and a homophobia.

  2. Oh there is sooo much more to Bishop Henry and the behind-the-scene Anglican ¨wreakage¨ that

    +Orombi has actively participated in (current appeals for Episcopal Church parish properties are still before the Supreme Courts of Georgia and California after Henry and schismatic U.S. ¨associates¨ lost court cases)…the many ¨fund raising¨ schemes promoted by The Anglican Church in Uganda are scandalous but never the less he and his ¨operatives¨ ought not forget that much of the Anglican Communion ¨dysfunction¨ is of their own

    initiating “>http://www.boxturtlebulletin.com/2010/07/07/24070″> HERE .

    Later, Bishop Orombi and his House of Bishops (and Nigerias too) boycotted The Lambeth Conference (never mind the REAL fact that openly Gay Bishop V.G. Robinson was forbade participation and Episcopal ¨fellowship¨ by the Archbishop of Canterbury).

    The destructionists in Uganda and Nigeria have been busy for a very long time…odd Bishop Henry is just now aware of the brokeness and dysfunction backing up on this throne.

  3. And lest we forget…..

    Martyn Minns has accused TEC of using its money to extort support in the Global South. Orombi’s comments debunk Minns’ lie as it seems the millions from Trinity Wall Street bought and brought nothing but more contempt for TEC.

    The only dysfunction around is the craven politics of schism generated by Minns and the ACNA and their cohorts in Africa, South America and Asia.

    I am all for supporting projects that bring improvement to the lives of the poor —without any strings– but I too question the judgment of Trinity Wall Street in funding a gathering in which TEC is further abused. That is typical behavior for a battered person.

  4. Michael, remember that the Conference of Anglican Provinces in Africa, although meeting in Kampala, is not a Ugandan event. It will include bishops from provinces that won’t talk to us (Uganda, Nigeria); provinces that largely agree with us (Southern Africa); provinces that are divided (Central Africa); and provinces that disagree but want to remain in communion with the Episcopal Church (Burundi). There may even be some bishops of the Episcopal Church there, if the Liberians attend. So, Trinity’s small participation (and $25,000 is pretty small for an event like this) isn’t per se supporting those who hate us.

    I think we also need to remember that we in the Episcopal Church have always said that we would support mission without requiring agreement, in a direct, “coals of fire” challenge to decisions like Uganda’s. We don’t want to be required to conform, and we don’t ask folks to conform to us. Trinity as an individual institution has made the same commitment. So, it seems an expression of integrity to support the CAPA meeting, even at the cost of some voices of rejection.

    Marshall Scott

Write a Reply or Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *