News from Africa

Sudan. Next Monday Daniel Deng, the archbishop of the Episcopal church of Sudan, and Rowan Williams, the archbishop of Canterbury, will meet Gordon Brown to discuss the growing crisis in the Sudan.


Liberia. Cuttington University, founded in 1889 by the Protestant Episcopal Church of the United States as Cuttington College and Divinity School, yesterday conferred the honorary degree Doctor of Divinity on the church’s presiding bishop, Most Rev. Dr. Katherine Jefferts Schori. The bishop arrived in Liberia last Saturday on a weeklong visit as guest of Episcopal diocesan Bishop Jonathan B.B. Hart and his wife, Frances Amanda Hart.

Uganda. From the Uganda President’s Media Centre comes an article, We should all rise up and fight child abuse.

Orombi calls upon politicians not to bribe voters.

Nigeria. Akinola turns his wrath on corrupt politicians and the media.

Category : The Lead
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2 Comments
  1. Dcn Scott Elliott

    The concepts in the Uganda article seemed to me all to the good, except for a chilling pair of sentences in the fourth paragraph:

    “Research has proven that rehabilitation does not change perverts or prevent them from hurting someone else. In order to stop the violence, we need to expand our understanding of child abuse.”

    “Perverts” is an unusual expression to use to refer to child abusers, and from context, it is clear that the writer does not mean to refer narrowly to pedophiles. So who exactly is meant by ‘child-abusing perverts?”

    And is the “expanded understanding” of child abuse meant to include chaste, adult-with-adult homosexual behavior?

  2. I know ERD has had problems with South India and assume that Nigeria and Uganda do not take our aid, but what, generally, has been the history of aid to and through the churches (in Africa for a start) getting to where it does the most good — as opposed to, say, satin cushions on the cathedra? Does anyone know a good source?

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