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Medieval library chains

Medieval library chains

Libraries in the Medieval and Renaissance Periods Figure 2.jpg

General view of part of the Library attached to the Church of S. Wallberg at Zutphen.Libraries in the Medieval and Renaissance Periods Figure 2” by Unknownarchive.org. Licensed under Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons.

Evidence suggests book theft was a problem in medieval times.

Medieval Books blog:

The least subtle but most effective way to keep your books safe was to chain them to a bookcase. … There is nothing like seeing a medieval book in its natural habitat, where the chains produce a “cling-cling” sound when you walk too close to them – a sound that must have been familiar to medieval users of chained libraries.

The primary reason for chaining a book was, obviously, safekeeping. Just like phones and tablets on display in modern stores are fixed to their display tables with straps, these precious medieval books were bolted to the library that owned them. This feature of stabilitas loci (to allude to the Benedictine ideal of staying in one location your entire life) turns the chain into something interesting beyond the strictly book-historical. It shows, after all, that the text inside the object was available in a public or semi-public place, such as a church or a cathedral. In other words, chains (or traces of them) suggest how information was accessed.

Considering these two practical theft-prevention techniques – chaining your books to something unmovable or putting them into a safe – the third seems kind of odd: to write a curse against book thieves inside the book. Your typical curse (or anathema) simply stated that the thief would be cursed, like this one in a book from an unidentified Church of St Caecilia: “Whoever takes this book or steals it or in some evil way removes it from the Church of St Caecilia, may he be damned and cursed forever, unless he returns it or atones for his act.” …

Related: Church security: Are you concerned?


Posted by John B. Chilton

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