Sunday Social Hour

Interesting week on the socnets, as some folks call social networks. Relatively quiet, with plenty of Facebook thumbs-ups and Twitter retweets.

On Facebook, several people scratched their heads at the headline "CANA says women turned off by complexity," so we did a bit of digging and revised the article to CANA says Episcopal Church a cause of growth in Islam. Since the feed doesn't pick up revised posts, if you read the Cafe through a newsreader or via Facebook/Twitter you may want to revisit the story. Derek Olsen observed in a comment here on the Café, "I'm no fan of CANA, but the BBC piece crosses the line on misquoting."

Speaking of Derek Olsen, his post on the Daily Episcopalian called Anglo-Catholicism: What the heck is it? generated a lot of me-toos and amens on Facebook (comments here).

Our Facebook LOL moment of the week comes from Alexander McPhail, who wryly observed his relief that Bishop Mike Klusmeyer was indeed planning a descent at the New River Gorge—rather than a dissent, as often bishops get reported as doing around here.

On Twitter, @sarahgbennett got props from @keepercaines34 for her personal blog post The Conversation: The Art of Listening, Learning and Sharing. He submitted it for Café discussion using the #ecafe hashtag. A brief excerpt:

An extraordinary thing is happening on the internet: real conversations are taking place where people are listening to other people’s ideas, learning about different perspectives, and sharing their unique knowledge. It seems to me that those of us in the Church could benefit greatly from being a part of this online conversation. But for many of us, especially those of us in our 40s and beyond, feel intimidated and stressed by all this new media stuff. It’s feels as if “cyberspace” has become the proverbial “outer space.” Where users adopt wacky personas and speak in otherwordly language. Recently I came across this beautiful graphic by Brian Solis and loved the way it helped me begin to make sense of the social media tools de jour and the ways in which they are enabling these important conversations to take place.

Read it all here.

@keepercaines34 also shared his sermon from last week, apparently composed after seeing U2 in concert. Wonder how many other people have checked in with their current tour and felt themselves inspired by it?

You too can submit content for our weekly social media roundup by hash-tagging it as #ecafe on Twitter or posting it to our Wall on Facebook. We look forward to hearing from you!

Comments (1)

Because the post on CANA did raise questions I did contact the BBC reporter. He stood by the story on complexity as based on a telephone interview with CANA's representative. Here's the key paragraph in my revised post:

As to the sentence, "It says the women are marrying Muslim men partly because of the dearth of marriageable men in their own churches" the BBC reporter confirms by email that "it" refers to CANA and that Dobbs made this point in a telephone interview with the reporter's colleague.

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