Resistance: Fall of Man

Prime Minister Tony Blair and Parliament weigh in on the use of scenes in Manchester Cathedral in Sony's new video game, Resistance: Fall of Man.

Covered by Episcopal Cafe in Digital Images, Real Controversy, the issue of property rights, virtual and real, has become a hot topic in the blogosphere. Gamers, the church, and now the UK government are debating the issue with surprising alliances across groups.

Tech Shout reports:

During the Prime Minister’s Questions, Tony Lloyd, MP for Manchester Central, started asking his question by observing, “When large organisations like Sony find their copyright has been breached, they’re very quick to use the law.”

He added, “Would the Prime Minister agree with me then that when Sony used images of Manchester Cathedral as part a game which extols gun violence, this was not only in bad taste but also very, very insulting to not simply the Church of England, but people across the land who think it’s inappropriate that big corporations behave in this way?”

Blair replied, “I agree with my honourable friend. I think it’s important that any of the companies engaged in promoting these types of goods have some sense of responsibility and also some sensitivity to the feelings of others. I think this is an immensely difficult area, the relationship between what happens with these games and its impact on young people,” the prime minister went on.

“I’ve no doubt this debate will go on for a significant period of time, but I do agree. I think it is important that people understand there is a wider social responsibility as well as an interior responsibility for profits.


Read the rest here.

Meanwhile, Dave Walker at Cartoon Church has his own view of the controversy, links to more opinions, and a lively discussion: Stop Shooting Things in Manchester Cathedral.

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