One in five voters a "none"

Katherine Stewart writes in Religious Dispatches:

Imagine a demographic that has doubled its share of the population over the past two decades, is up by 25 percent over the past four years alone, and now accounts for as many as one in five Americans. Imagine that this demographic votes disproportionately for one political party—to the tune of 70 percent for Obama versus 26 percent for Romney in the 2012 election. Sounds like a demographic that ought to be of interest to politicians, journalists, and activists, right?

That demographic consists of people who describe themselves as atheist, agnostic, or religiously unaffiliated—the “nones,” as they’re sometimes called. And it hasn’t attracted anywhere near the attention it deserves in the postgame analysis of the 2012 election.
....
The Public Religion Research Institute, in a study published on November 15, pegs the religiously unaffiliated at 16 percent of the electorate—and they figure that 78 percent of the category went for Obama. Crucially, like Latinos, the nones are young. One in three Americans under 30 are religiously unaffiliated—four times the rate for the over-65 cohort that keeps Rove in business. This isn’t a trickle, it’s a tsunami.

h/t to Friends of Jake blog

Comments (1)

And of course, the extreme pushing of religion into politics has nothing to do with it. We really need to either enforce the no politicization from religion or remove the tax exemption completely.

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