Gathering storm: climate change and humanitarian efforts

IRIN, the humanitarian news and analysis service of the UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs, June issue, has an in-depth report and analysis of the effect of humanitarian efforts to mitigate the devastation caused to the poorest of the poor by climate change:


Bholar Basti, a slum of 30,000 people in the Bangladeshi capital Dhaka, is not where Alimullah Mia and his wife and three children dreamt of living but that is where they have been for more than a decade.

They once lived in a village called Helai Kandi on the western shores of Bhola, an island district in the estuary of Bangladesh’s three main rivers – the Meghna, Padma and Brahmaputra.

“We had our home in the village, more than an acre of land, two cows and a plough,” the 45-year-old recalled. “Fifteen years ago, the Meghna devoured everything in a matter of six months, rendering us homeless and poverty-stricken. There was no job, no food, and no security of life.”

After two months on the levee, they headed to Dhaka where they found others just like them.

“There were other people too. We followed them and ended up at Bholar Basti [slum of Bhola people],” he said.

From being a self-sufficient and established farmer, he soon found himself penniless and became a push cart operator instead. “My wife became a domestic servant and my children are nothing but urchins,” Mia lamented.

For most residents of Bholar Basti, the story is more or less the same.


IRIN has a 3 part report on Climate Change, from part 2:
The world can expect to become about 0.2°C warmer per decade for the next two decades, according to several scenarios prepared by the Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change (IPCC). Even if the concentrations of all greenhouse gases and aerosols were kept constant at the levels they were in 2000, further warming of about 0.1°C per decade would still be expected.

The rising temperature has already begun to affect human lives and will continue to do so. Here is a brief look at how.

Information and many more articles can be read here

Comments (1)

It is quite unusual to see such an articulate 'Third World' picture in a 'First World' setting. When the Lambeth bishops completed their Millenium Development Goals walk in London, would that they could had visited Bholar Basti with IRIN than going for tea with the Queen. Thanks for posting this sensitive report.

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