We all need the Anglicans right now

In the NCR Café Joan Chittister writes her column From Where I Stand this week on why the world needs Anglicans at this time in the history of the church. She explores the question of unity. From where does it arise and how is it given authority? She hopes that the Anglicans will discover the path for other churches to follow.

So the question the Anglican communion is facing for us all right now is a clear one: What happens to a group, to a church, that stands poised to choose either confusion or tyranny, either anarchy or authoritarianism, either unity or uniformity? Are there really only two choices possible at such a moment? Is there nowhere in-between?

The struggle going on inside the Anglican Communion about the episcopal ordination of homosexual priests and the recognition of the homosexual lifestyle as a natural state is not peculiar to Anglicanism. The issue is in the air we breathe. The Anglicans simply got there earlier than most. And so they may well become a model to the rest of us of how to handle such questions. If the rate and kinds of social, biological, scientific and global change continue at the present pace, every religious group may well find itself at the breakpoint between "tradition" and "science" sooner rather than later.

Theological questions driven by new scientific findings, new social realities, new technological possibilities abound. How moral is it to take cells from one person for the treatment of another if all human cells are potentially life generating? Is that the destruction of life? If homosexuality is "natural," meaning biologically configured at birth, why is it immoral for homosexuals to live in homosexual unions -- even if they are bishops? After all, isn't that what we said -- in fact, did -- when we argued "scientifically" that blacks were not fit for ordination because blacks weren't quite as human as whites? And so we kept them out of our seminaries and called ourselves "Christian" for doing it. Without even the grace to blush.

and concludes

From where I stand we need those who can develop a model of faith in times of uncertainty in which the tradition is revered and the prophetic is honored. Unless we want to see ourselves go into either tyranny or anarchy, we better pray for the Anglicans so that they can show us how to do that.

Read it all here

Comments (2)

A natural partner to Chittister's essay is Sam Candler's essay to today's Daily Episcopalian,
http://www.episcopalcafe.com/daily/episcopal_church/the_episcopal_church_is_a_prot.php

As I traveled west yesterday, the gentleman to my left assured me of the prayers of the Lutheran Assembly. They too are looking towards the Anglicans, hopeful for a beacon that will light their own global way.

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