Comment is free: "I am not the Archbishop of Canterbury"

Have a look at Jim's article on the Comment is Free section of the Guardian's Web site:

As archbishop, Williams might feel that the proper execution of his office requires that he puts aside his personal convictions. Juggling numerous concerns and multiple constituencies, he may have reason not to speak out boldly on behalf of one marginalised audience for fear of alienating another. Equipped with a variety of subtle ways to move the Anglican Communion toward a fuller understanding of human sexuality, he can initiate imperceptible advances on one front while publicly taking a hard line on the other. There are wheels within wheels, and he can make them all spin. He is the Archbishop of Canterbury.

But I am not. And neither are you. We can either speak our truth - which as it turns out is also his truth (and more important, we believe, His truth) and organize ourselves to reform the Churches we love, or we can sit back, beg our gay and lesbian brothers and sisters to be patient, and hope that somehow the Communion will arrive at a new consensus on homosexuality without anyone seeming to have so much as nudged it in that direction.

Comments (5)

Thank you, Jim.

It becomes clearer to me every day that the price the Episcopal Church is being asked to pay is far too high when compared with the limited good of unity. A false unity, it seems to me.

If we rescind B011 next summer, it may mean that we are no longer considered fully "in communion," whatever that means. But it will also be a beacon of hope, not only to GLBT Christians in our own country and context, but to GLBT Christians across the world. Think of those Christians in "Voices of Africa," terrorized, beaten, even killed because of who they love. If they hear that we have stood up for the dignity of all people in our context, it may give them hope and strength to continue the struggle for the dignity of all people in their own context. At least, that is my prayer.

Jason Cox

Think of those Christians in "Voices of Africa," terrorized, beaten, even killed because of who they love. If they hear that we have stood up for the dignity of all people in our context, it may give them hope and strength to continue the struggle for the dignity of all people in their own context. At least, that is my prayer.

Jason Cox

My thoughts exactly...but I think that's been the message we having been sending to the "excluded" at The Anglican Communion/beyond for a very long time...I bet we're even just a rumor shared by people who have hope beyond their greatest imagination in their heart.

Millions of Christians/others know us by what we do at The Episcopal Church.

Ah, yes... it's wonderful to be asked to be patient. As a person who is both gay and black, I seem to recall that justice deferred is justice denied. How many people will not even walk into a church while others titter and debate about their worthiness... for if you reject the worthiness of a person for service based solely on their affectional orientation you have sent a message to all those like them in that respect that they are not worthy. You have effectively rejected those who might be drawn to such a seat of compassion to decide there is no such compassion - and stay away. And all to preserve your own comfort as your churches empty with none to fill the pews. The harvest is white everywhere. We need more laborers not fewer. And Christ was not so picky as to turn away those who were willing to take the hard road of following him. For it's not something taken up lightly by anyone. And no one - heterosexual or otherwise - takes up that cross without being transformed into the very likeness of Christ, whether we like the fact that Christ uses those not like us or not.

(EDITOR'S REMINDER: Please sign your posts!!!)

Jim, great article. Thank you for all that you do and that this website does on behalf of the LGBT community!

Bert Russ

Thanks for the reminder, sir... that rant above is from Br. Christopher JC Lewis, UrbanCyberMonk.

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